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Your Environment. Your Health.

Mold

Molded sink and wall

Description

Molds are microscopic organisms that play an important role in the breakdown of plant and animal matter. Outdoors, molds can be found in shady, damp areas, or places where leaves or other vegetation is decomposing. Indoor molds can grow on virtually any surface, as long as moisture, oxygen, and organic material are present. When molds are disturbed, they release tiny cells called spores into the surrounding air.

 

What are the most common forms of mold?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the most common indoor molds are:

 

What are some of the health effects associated with mold exposure?  

Symptoms stemming from mold spore exposure may include:

  • Nasal and sinus congestion
  • Eye irritation
  • Blurred vision
  • Sore throat
  • Chronic cough
  • Skin rash

After contact with certain molds, individuals with chronic respiratory disease may have difficulty breathing, and people who are immunocompromised may be at increased risk for lung infection. A study conducted by NIEHS-funded scientists shows that mold exposure during the first year of life may increase the risk of childhood asthma.

 

What can I do to get rid of mold in my home?

According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), residents can do any of the following to prevent, and or get rid of, mold in their homes:

  • Keep your house clean and dry.
  • Fix water problems, such as roof leaks, wet basements, and leaking pipes or faucets.
  • Make sure your home is well ventilated, and always use ventilation fans in bathrooms and kitchens.
  • If possible, keep humidity in your house below 50 percent, by using an air conditioner or dehumidifier.
  • Avoid using carpeting in areas of the home that may become wet, such as kitchens, bathrooms, and basements.
  • Dry floor mats regularly.

More information, including a fact sheet  , "Healthy Home Issues: Mold," is available on the HUD website  .

 

Factsheets

What NIEHS is Doing on Mold 

NIEHS is involved in several studies on mold.

 

The HEAL Study

The Head-off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana (HEAL) Project is a collaborative study conducted by the Tulane University Health Sciences Center and the New Orleans Department of Health. The purpose of the project is to learn about the effects of mold and other indoor allergens on children with asthma in post-Katrina New Orleans.

To learn more, visit The HEAL Study  .

 

Additional mold studies sponsored by NIEHS

General Information 

Related Topics 


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