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Your Environment. Your Health.

Superfund Research Program

  • A collage of hazardous waste drums, a scientist doing fieldwork, two scientists in a lab, and a child holding a globe

    Superfund Research Program Science Digest

    Check out the December 2018 issue of the SRP Science Digest, which showcases SRP research providing practical, scientific solutions to protect health, the environment, and communities.
  • Zebrafish larva next to a machine that tracks zebrafish larvae

    Research Brief 288: Alternative Flame Retardants May Lead to Neurobehavioral Effects

    Organophosphate flame retardant (OPFR) exposure early in life may be linked to behavioral impacts into adulthood, according to a new study in zebrafish. The results provide evidence that OPFRs, which have been introduced in commercial products in the past decade, may not be a safe alternative to brominated flame retardants, which were phased out because they were found to be harmful to normal development.
  • Stephanie Kim

    Congratulations to Stephanie Kim, the 21st recipient of the Karen Wetterhahn Memorial Award!

    The award recognizes one outstanding SRP graduate student or postdoctoral researcher who exemplifies qualities of scientific excellence. Kim was presented the award on November 29 at the Superfund Research Program (SRP) Annual Meeting in Sacramento, California.
  • Joshua Preston working in a lab

    SRP Trainee Highlight

    University of Kentucky (UK) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center trainee Joshua Preston is an undergraduate senior working under the guidance of Kevin Pearson, Ph.D. With the SRP team, Preston is exploring how exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) during and around pregnancy impacts offspring later in development.
  • Two scientists working in a lab

    New P42 Center Request for Applications (RFA)

    The new P42 Center RFA, Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training Program (P42 Clinical Trial Optional), is now live. For additional information/resources, check out our Multiproject Center Grants (P42) section. The application deadline is December 19, 2018.
  • Two trainees in a lab

    The Superfund Research Program's Economic and Societal Benefits

    We are pleased to announce the publication of Assessing the Economic and Societal Benefits of SRP-Funded Research in the June 2018 issue of Environmental Health Perspectives. Check it out, along with the accompanying editorial by NIEHS Director Linda Birnbaum, Ph.D.
  • Superfund Research Program Map

    Where We Work

    If you are interested in learning more about where SRP grantees are working, check out the SRP map to see the locations of SRP grantees, as well as hazardous waste sites where they conduct research or outreach.
  • Newspaper and laptop

    Hot off the Press

    Read the latest publications from SRP researchers.
  • Telescope

    SRP Search Tools

    SRP has five search tools to help you learn more about the projects and researchers funded by the Program. The new SRP Faceted Search tool allows you to apply one or more filters to browse information about SRP projects. Filters include chemicals studied, health outcomes, environmental media, and remediation approaches.

The NIEHS Hazardous Substance Basic Research and Training Program (Superfund Research Program [SRP]) provides practical, scientific solutions to protect health, the environment, and communities. As part of NIEHS, an Institute of the National Institutes of Health, SRP works to learn more about ways to protect the public from exposure to hazardous substances, such as industrial solvents, arsenic, lead, and mercury. These and other toxic substances are found in contaminated water, soil, and air at hazardous waste sites throughout the United States.

SRP funds university-based grants on basic biological, environmental, and engineering processes to find real and practical solutions to exposures to hazardous substances. These activities complement the work of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, and other federal and state agencies.

In keeping with the NIEHS mission, SRP's teams of diverse professionals develop, test, and implement unique, solution-oriented approaches to address complex environmental health problems. These teams study environmental contaminants in order to lower environmental cleanup costs, reduce human exposure, and improve human health. SRP's central goal is to understand and break the link between chemical exposure and disease.

To instantly hear about SRP news, research advances, events, and job opportunities for SRP trainees, follow @SRP_NIEHS on Twitter.

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