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Your Environment. Your Health.

Workers' Health

Introduction

workers wearing biohazard suits working at waste processing plant sorting recyclable plastic on conveyor belt

Workers' Health

Workers may be exposed to hazards in many types of jobs. These hazards may include chemical agents and solvents, heavy metals such as lead and mercury, physical agents such as loud noise or vibrations, and physical risks such as electricity or dangerous machinery. The field of occupational health identifies and helps control these hazards to protect workers’ health.

What is NIEHS Doing?

  • The Worker Training Program (WTP) - Under the Superfund Act of 1986, NIEHS initiated WTP as a training grants program to assist workers who handle hazardous waste or respond to emergency releases of hazardous materials. WTP works with organizations across the country and has reached more than 3.5 million people with high-quality, targeted training. Workers come from a variety of sectors, and some WTP programs address the unique needs of emergency responders. WTP has six major training programs plus a National Clearing House for Worker Safety and Health Training.
    • The Hazardous Waste Worker Training Program provides occupational safety and health training for workers who may be engaged in activities related to hazardous waste removal, containment, or chemical emergency response.
    • The Environmental Career Worker Training Program has provided job training to roughly 12,000 people in underserved communities, teaching the skills necessary to obtain employment in environmental cleanup and construction fields.
    • The HAZMAT Disaster Preparedness Training Program supports the development and delivery of training to prepare workers for hazardous material and debris cleanup needed after natural and man-made disasters.
    • The Small Business Innovation Research E-Learning for HAZMAT Program provides grants to organizations to develop e-learning products, such as virtual reality and handheld device applications.
    • The NIEHS/Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Worker Training Program provides safety and health training for hazardous material handlers and waste workers at DOE facilities. Many of these workers are engaged in the cleanup of closed nuclear weapons facilities, among the most radioactive sites in the world. Workers deal with radioactive wastes, spent nuclear fuel, excess plutonium and uranium, and contaminated soil and groundwater.
    • The Ebola Biosafety and Infectious Disease Response Training Program develops and delivers infection control practices and hazard recognition training for workers in health care and non-health care settings who may be at risk of exposure to infectious diseases, such as Ebola, Zika, and flu.
    • The National Clearinghouse for Worker Safety and Health Training is a national resource for hazardous-waste worker curricula, technical reports, and weekly news on hazardous materials, waste operations, and emergency response. Funded by WTP, the National Clearinghouse provides technical assistance to program staff and awardees, and the public.
  • NIEHS Partnerships for Environmental Public Health (PEPH) involves researchers, public health officials, and communities working together to use research to improve health.
  • National Toxicology Program (NTP) - Workers may encounter a range of chemicals while doing their jobs. Chemicals like asbestos, bisphenol A (BPA), pesticides, and heavy metals are known to cause adverse health effects. NIEHS and NTP research many of these agents and their potential effects on animals and humans.
  • The NIEHS Gulf Oil Spill Response Efforts are programs that provided timely and responsive services following the Deepwater Horizon Gulf oil spill of 2010. NIEHS research and training efforts in this area continue.
  • The NIH Disaster Research Response Program (DR2) is a national framework for research on the medical and public health aspects of disasters and public health emergencies. The DR2 website, provided by NIEHS and the National Library of Medicine, supports disaster science investigators by offering data collection tools, research protocols, disaster research news and events, and more.
  • The Agricultural Health Study, supported by NIEHS and three other federal agencies, is working to understand how agricultural, lifestyle, and genetic factors affect the health of farmers and their families. So far, researchers have evaluated more than 20 pesticides to determine whether the farmers who use them have a greater chance of developing cancer.

Further Reading

Stories from the Environmental Factor (NIEHS Newsletter)


Fact Sheet

Worker Training Program

Additional Resources

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