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Your Environment. Your Health.

Windy Boyd, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Science Editor

Windy Boyd, Ph.D
Windy A. Boyd, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Science Editor, Environmental Health Perspectives
Tel 984-287-3115
boydw@niehs.nih.gov
P.O. Box 12233
Mail Drop K3-01
Durham, N.C. 27709

Windy Boyd, Ph.D., M.P.H., is a science editor with EHP located at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). Along with the rest of the EHP editorial team, Windy’s primary responsibility is to oversee the peer review process of manuscripts submitted to the journal. Regular activities include manuscript review and decision making; outreach to associate editors, reviewers, and authors; and development of editorial policies.

Before joining EHP, Dr. Boyd worked for over a decade in the National Toxicology Program (NTP) at NIEHS. Her most recent position at NTP was in the Office of Health Assessment and Translation (OHAT) where she led scientific literature analyses to evaluate the associations between a variety of environmental chemical exposures and adverse health outcomes. Prior to OHAT, she managed the NTP WormTox Screening Facility, which developed bioassays using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an alternative model organism in high-throughput toxicological screening.

Windy received B.S. and M.S. degrees in horticulture science from Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas and a Ph.D. in environmental toxicology from the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia in 2002. Before joining NIEHS in 2006, she worked as a post-doctoral research fellow in the Integrated Toxicology Program at Duke University. In 2013, she earned an M.P.H. in Nutrition from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and became a board-certified Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) in early 2014.

Selected Publications

  1. Boyd, WA, Blain, RB, Skuce, CR, Thayer, KA, Rooney, AA. 2019. NTP Research Report on the Scoping Review of Paraquat Dichloride Exposure and Parkinson’s Disease. NTP Research Report 15. Research Triangle Park, NC: National Toxicology Program, in press.
  2. Boyd, WA, Boyles, AL, Blain, RB, Skuce, CR, Engstrom, AK, Walker, VR, Thayer, KA, Rooney, AA. 2018. NTP Research Report on the Scoping Review of Potential Human Health Effects Associated with Exposures to Neonicotinoids Pesticides. NTP RR 15. Research Triangle Park, NC: National Toxicology Program, in press.
  3. Lunn RM, Blask DE, Coogan AN, Figueiro MG, Gorman MR, Hall JE, Hansen J, Nelson RJ, Panda S, Smolensky MH, Stevens RG, Turek FW, Vermeulen R, Carreón T, Caruso CC, Lawson CC, Thayer KA, Twery MJ, Ewens AD, Garner SC, Schwingl PJ, Boyd WA. 2017. Health consequences of electric lighting practices in the modern world: a report on the National Toxicology Program’s Workshop on Shift Work at Night, Artificial Light at Night, and Circadian Disruption. Science of the Total Environment, doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.07.056. [Abstract Lunn RM, Blask DE, Coogan AN, Figueiro MG, Gorman MR, Hall JE, Hansen J, Nelson RJ, Panda S, Smolensky MH, Stevens RG, Turek FW, Vermeulen R, Carreón T, Caruso CC, Lawson CC, Thayer KA, Twery MJ, Ewens AD, Garner SC, Schwingl PJ, Boyd WA. 2017. Health consequences of electric lighting practices in the modern world: a report on the National Toxicology Program’s Workshop on Shift Work at Night, Artificial Light at Night, and Circadian Disruption. Science of the Total Environment, doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.07.056.]
  4. Xia M, Huang R, Shi Q, Boyd WA, Zhao J, Sun N, Chu PH, Rice JR, Dunlap PE, Hackstadt AJ, Bridge MF, Smith MV, Dai S, Gerhold D, Zheng W, Witt KL, DeVito M, Freedman JH, Austin CP, Houck KA, Thomas RS, Paules RS, Tice RR, Simeonov A. 2018. Comprehensive analyses and prioritization of Tox21 10K chemicals affecting mitochondrial function by in-depth mechanistic studies. Environmental Health Perspectives, doi: 10.1289/EHP2589. [Abstract Xia M, Huang R, Shi Q, Boyd WA, Zhao J, Sun N, Chu PH, Rice JR, Dunlap PE, Hackstadt AJ, Bridge MF, Smith MV, Dai S, Gerhold D, Zheng W, Witt KL, DeVito M, Freedman JH, Austin CP, Houck KA, Thomas RS, Paules RS, Tice RR, Simeonov A. 2018. Comprehensive analyses and prioritization of Tox21 10K chemicals affecting mitochondrial function by in-depth mechanistic studies. Environmental Health Perspectives, doi: 10.1289/EHP2589.]
  5. Behl M, Rice JR, Smith MV, Co CA, Bridge MF, Hsieh J, Freedman JH, Boyd WA. 2016. Comparative Toxicity of Organophosphate Flame Retardants and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers to C. elegans. Toxicological Sciences, doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfw162. [Abstract Behl M, Rice JR, Smith MV, Co CA, Bridge MF, Hsieh J, Freedman JH, Boyd WA. 2016. Comparative Toxicity of Organophosphate Flame Retardants and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers to C. elegans. Toxicological Sciences, doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfw162.]
  6. Boyd WA, Smith MV, Co CA, Pirone JR, Rice JR, Shockley KR, Freedman JH. 2016. Developmental Effects of the ToxCast Phase I and Phase II Chemicals in Caenorhabditis elegans and Corresponding Responses in Zebrafish, Rats, and Rabbits. Environmental health perspectives, 124(5):586-593. [Abstract Boyd WA, Smith MV, Co CA, Pirone JR, Rice JR, Shockley KR, Freedman JH. 2016. Developmental Effects of the ToxCast Phase I and Phase II Chemicals in Caenorhabditis elegans and Corresponding Responses in Zebrafish, Rats, and Rabbits. Environmental health perspectives, 124(5):586-593.]
  7. Behl, M, Hsieh, JH, Shafer, TJ, Mundy, WR, Rice, JR, Boyd, WA, Freedman JH, Hunter III ES, Jarema KA, Padilla S, Tice, RR. 2015. Use of alternative assays to identify and prioritize organophosphorus flame retardants for potential developmental and neurotoxicity. Neurotoxicology and Teratology, 52, Part B: 181-193. [Abstract Behl, M, Hsieh, JH, Shafer, TJ, Mundy, WR, Rice, JR, Boyd, WA, Freedman JH, Hunter III ES, Jarema KA, Padilla S, Tice, RR. 2015. Use of alternative assays to identify and prioritize organophosphorus flame retardants for potential developmental and neurotoxicity. Neurotoxicology and Teratology, 52, Part B: 181-193.]
  8. Rice JR, Boyd WA, Chandra D, Smith MV, Den Besten PK, Freedman JH. 2014. Comparison of the toxicity of fluoridation compounds in the nematode C. elegans. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 33:82-88, doi:10.1002/etc.2394. [Abstract Rice JR, Boyd WA, Chandra D, Smith MV, Den Besten PK, Freedman JH. 2014. Comparison of the toxicity of fluoridation compounds in the nematode C. elegans. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 33:82-88, doi:10.1002/etc.2394.]
  9. Harrington J, Boyd W, Smith M, Rice J, Freedman J, Crumbliss A. 2012. Amelioration of Metal-Induced Toxicity In Caenorhabditis Elegans: Utility of Chelating Agents in the Bioremediation Of Metals. Toxicological Sciences, 129:49-56 [Abstract Harrington J, Boyd W, Smith M, Rice J, Freedman J, Crumbliss A. 2012. Amelioration of Metal-Induced Toxicity In Caenorhabditis Elegans: Utility of Chelating Agents in the Bioremediation Of Metals. Toxicological Sciences, 129:49-56]
  10. Leung MCK, Goldstone JV, Boyd WA, Freedman JH, Meyer JN. 2010. Caenorhabditis elegans generates biologically relevant levels of genotoxic metabolites from aflatoxin B1 but not Benzo[a]pyrene in vivo. Toxicological Sciences, 118(2):444-453. [Abstract Leung MCK, Goldstone JV, Boyd WA, Freedman JH, Meyer JN. 2010. Caenorhabditis elegans generates biologically relevant levels of genotoxic metabolites from aflatoxin B1 but not Benzo[a]pyrene in vivo. Toxicological Sciences, 118(2):444-453.]
  11. Boyd WA, McBride SJ, Rice JR, Snyder DW, Freedman JH. 2010. A high-throughput method for assessing chemical toxicity using a Caenorhabditis elegans reproduction assay. Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, 245:153-159. [Abstract Boyd WA, McBride SJ, Rice JR, Snyder DW, Freedman JH. 2010. A high-throughput method for assessing chemical toxicity using a Caenorhabditis elegans reproduction assay. Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, 245:153-159.]
  12. Boyd WA, Crocker TL, Rodriguez AM, Leung M, Lehmann DW, Freedman JH, Van Houten B, Meyer JN. 2010. Nucleotide excision repair genes are expressed at low levels and are not detectably inducible in Caenorhabditis elegans somatic tissues, but their function is required for normal adult life after UVC exposure. Mutation Research - Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis, 683(1-2):57-67. [Abstract Boyd WA, Crocker TL, Rodriguez AM, Leung M, Lehmann DW, Freedman JH, Van Houten B, Meyer JN. 2010. Nucleotide excision repair genes are expressed at low levels and are not detectably inducible in Caenorhabditis elegans somatic tissues, but their function is required for normal adult life after UVC exposure. Mutation Research - Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis, 683(1-2):57-67.]
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