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Your Environment. Your Health.

Maintaining and Enriching Environmental Epidemiology Cohorts

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NIEHS makes significant investments in human population studies that help scientists better understand how environmental exposures affect health during different stages of life. These studies advance our understanding of how exposure to harmful chemicals, lifestyle factors, and genetics contribute to health and disease, and are a valuable resource to the entire environmental health community.

Scientists conduct environmental epidemiology cohort studies by systematically following groups of people with common characteristics or exposures over time. Establishing and maintaining these cohorts requires time, personnel, money, and infrastructure.

NIEHS launched a funding opportunity to help researchers maintain and enrich the infrastructure needed to investigate new research questions using existing cohorts and to collaborate with other scientists.

The NIEHS-funded grants allow two categories of activities for existing cohorts: maintaining and enriching resource infrastructure, and enriching data management and data sharing. Within these categories, researchers may collect or develop additional measures of exposure and disease, and follow study participants for longer periods of time.

Information about current and previously funded institutions can be found on the Grantees page.

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