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Your Environment. Your Health.

Center Spotlight

Natasha K. DeJarnett, Ph.D.
DeJarnett Talks Climate Change and Health on APHA TV

December 06, 2022

At the 2022 American Public Health Association (APHA) conference, Natasha K. DeJarnett, Ph.D., sat down with APHA TV to discuss how climate change affects health. Dejarnett is a member of the NIEHS-funded Environmental Health Sciences Core Center at the University of Louisville and is chair-elect of the APHA Environment Section.


  • News & Media
  • University of Louisville
water bottles
Study Informs Community Education, Outreach Efforts to Address Drinking Water Concerns

November 30, 2022

Beliefs in some communities that tap water poses health risks may contribute to increased bottled water use, according to a study from the NIEHS-funded Southwest Environmental Health Science Center at the University of Arizona. A better understanding of the factors driving drinking water preferences can help inform efforts to educate community members about local water quality.


  • Publications
  • UAZ Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center
Wildfire at night near a city
During Wildfires, Indoor Air Quality Can Be Worse Than Outdoor Air

November 15, 2022

Levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were higher inside homes than outdoors during certain wildfire conditions, according to researchers from the NIEHS-funded Environmental Health Sciences Core Center at Oregon State University. The findings may inform public health messaging regarding wildfires, which currently does not account for indoor air quality.


  • Publications
  • Oregon State University
Lida Chatzi Headshot
Liver Injury Linked to PFAS Exposures, NIEHS Grantee Says

November 08, 2022

A large-scale study on exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in humans and rodents showed consistent evidence of chemical-driven liver damage, according to Lida Chatzi, M.D., Ph.D., deputy director of the NIEHS-funded Environmental Health Sciences Core Center at the University of Southern California. The study is the first systematic review and meta-analysis of scientific literature on exposure to PFAS and markers of liver injury. Read the NIEHS Environmental Factor article to learn more.


  • Publications
  • EHS Core Centers
Female typing on a laptop
Webinar Series Features Result Report Back Strategies

October 25, 2022

Strategies for effectively reporting research results to study participants – a practice known as “report back” – is the topic of a monthly webinar series jointly hosted by the NIEHS-funded Environmental Health Sciences (EHS) Core Centers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, the University of Kentucky, and Emory University. The five-part series, which began in September and runs through January 2023, covers a range of topics including how a digital tool can help researchers inform study participants of their chemical exposures and the role of citizen scientists in the report back process. Students, trainees, and environmental health researchers are invited to attend the series. Each webinar is scheduled from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. EST. Register for upcoming sessions.


  • Science Highlights
  • EHS Core Centers
EHSCC meeting picture
Core Centers Host Annual Conference

October 04, 2022

Racism, health inequities, climate change, and environmental justice were among the topics discussed at the annual meeting of the NIEHS Environmental Health Sciences (EHS) Core Centers, which was held in July at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. The meeting was the first since 2019 to offer an in-person option. Nearly 300 people attended the hybrid event. “The scientific community needs time and space to come together to learn and support each other. The fact that we could finally do that in person was fantastic,” said Robert Wright, M.D., who directs the EHS Core Center at Mount Sinai. Read the meeting summary description and watch videos of the poster presentations for a recap of meeting events and discussions. Children’s health was front and center during the latest Early-Stage Investigator Spotlight Webinar which was hosted by the NIEHS Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers Program on August 10.


  • Science Highlights
  • Mount Sinai EHS Core Center
Angelico Mendy, M.D., Ph.D. and Shelly Buffington, Ph.D.
Effects of Flame Retardants, Maternal Diet on Children Focus of Talk

September 01, 2022

Children’s health was front and center during the latest Early-Stage Investigator Spotlight Webinar, which was hosted by the NIEHS Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers Program on August 10. The webinar was the seventh in a series to showcase the research and accomplishments of early-stage investigators across the Core Centers Program. Angelico Mendy, M.D., Ph.D., (left) shared how replacement flame retardants affect children’s respiratory health. He is associated with the Center for Environmental Genetics at the University of Cincinnati. Shelly Buffington, Ph.D., (right) discussed links between diet-induced obesity in pregnant women and neurodevelopmental disorders in children. She is affiliated with the Baylor College of Medicine’s Gulf Coast Center for Precision Environmental Health.


  • Career Development
  • NIEHS Environmental Factor
The NIEHS Director and Deputy Director shared information on gene-environment interactions
Precision Health, Environmental Justice Focus of Community Forums

August 11, 2022

The NIEHS Director and Deputy Director shared information on gene-environment interactions, anti-racism in biomedical research, and more at two community forums hosted by NIEHS-funded Core Centers.
NIEHS and National Toxicology Program Director Rick Woychik, Ph.D., led a discussion on precision environmental health during his May 10 visit with the University of Cincinnati Center for Environmental Genetics. Woychik also toured Cincinnati and listened to community leaders discuss their efforts to reduce air pollution and address concerns about lack of clean water.
NIEHS Deputy Director Trevor Archer, Ph.D., gave a keynote presentation on addressing anti-racism in science as part of a virtual event hosted May 18 by the Mount Sinai Center on Health and Environment Across the LifeSpan.


  • Community Engagement
  • NIEHS Environmental Factor
Tap water poured into glass
PFAS in Blood Linked to Higher Diabetes Risk in Middle-aged Women

June 06, 2022

High concentrations of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in blood were associated with an increased risk of diabetes in middle-aged women, found NIEHS-funded researchers from the University of Michigan (UM). According to the authors, results suggest that lowering PFAS exposure could be a useful tool in combating diabetes, one of the leading causes of death in the U.S.
“It is important for clinicians to be aware of PFAS as an unrecognized risk factor for diabetes and to be prepared to counsel patients in terms of sources of exposure and potential health effects,” said lead study author Sung Kyun Park, Sc.D. Park co-leads the Integrated Health Sciences Core within the NIEHS-funded Lifestage for Environmental Exposures and Disease Center at UM.


  • Publications
  • UM News
Jane Hoppin, Sc.D., sits in front of laptop with NC State sticker
NC State’s Jane Hoppin Wins Holshouser Award

May 24, 2022

Jane Hoppin, Sc.D., received the 2021 Governor James E. Holshouser Jr. Award for Excellence in Public Service. The award honors faculty who exemplify the University of North Carolina System’s commitment to service and community engagement. Hoppin, who directs the NIEHS-funded Center for Human Health and the Environment at North Carolina State University, was recognized for her work examining the impact of environmental exposures on human health.


  • Awards
  • NC State
Study participants working on building protein and molecule models
Building a Model for Environmental Health Education

May 09, 2022

An educational approach that blends lectures and hands-on molecular modeling can improve nurses’ understanding of the interplay between environmental health and genetics in Native American communities, according to a recent study funded by NIEHS. The team included researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT) Center for Environmental Health Sciences and New York University’s Langone Center for the Investigation of Environmental Hazards — both Core Centers — and the University of New Mexico’s Health Sciences Center, in collaboration with Missouri Breaks Industries Research, Inc., and nursing students and nursing professionals serving tribal nations in New Jersey and South Dakota.


  • Publications
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Environmental Health Sciences
Environmental Justice Boot Camp - Scale and leaves
'Boot Camps' Draw Researchers Focused on Environmental Health Disparities

April 18, 2022

Scientists from across the U.S. are taking a deep dive into environmental justice research thanks to a series of short, intensive courses focused on uncovering the roots of environmental health disparities and highlighting real-world solutions. The “boot camps” are jointly hosted by the NIEHS-funded Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers at Harvard University, Columbia University, and the University of California, San Francisco.


  • Science Highlights
  • Harvard Center for Environmental Health
the face of a person wearing goggles watching as they fill a vile with liquid
Webinar Recognizes Early-career Scientists’ Research on Lead, Arsenic

April 05, 2022

Following its successful January launch of the Early-stage Investigator (ESI) Spotlight Webinar Series, the NIEHS Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers kept the momentum going February 9 with presentations on how early exposure to arsenic and lead can affect brain function. Erica Jansen, Ph.D., kicked off the event with her presentation “Do Toxicants Affect Adolescent Sleep? Findings From the Early Life Exposures in Mexico to Environmental Toxicants (ELEMENT) Study.” She is affiliated with the University of Michigan Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease Center. Hae-Ryung Park, Ph.D., presented “Mechanisms Underlying the Effect of Environmental Exposures on Neurodevelopment.” She is affiliated with the University of Rochester Environmental Health Sciences Center. Register for future ESI webinars.


  • Career Development
  • NIEHS Environmental Factor
Matthew Rand, Ph.D.
Mercury Exposure Affects More Than Just the Brain — Muscles, Too

March 30, 2022

New research from Matthew Rand, Ph.D., a member of the NIEHS-funded Environmental Health Sciences Center (EHSC) at the University of Rochester, sheds light on how methylmercury exposure affects the musculoskeletal system. Rand’s findings suggest that exposure may disrupt early development of the connections between muscles and the brain, which could lead to motor control problems later in life. Rand is also collaborating with other EHSC members to translate results from his mechanistic research into information that is applicable to how methylmercury affects humans. “This type of translational environmental health science is what makes significant advances happen, and it is made possible through our unique collaborative environment as well as the cores and facilities supported by NIEHS,” said EHSC Director B. Paige Lawrence, Ph.D.


  • Science Highlights
  • NIEHS Environmental Factor
Health equity advocate Barbara Israel, Dr.P.H., was awarded the 2022 Elizabeth Fries Health Education Award by the CDC Foundation.
Israel Receives 2022 Elizabeth Fries Health Education Award

March 24, 2022

Health equity advocate Barbara Israel, Dr.P.H., was awarded the 2022 Elizabeth Fries Health Education Award by the CDC Foundation. The award recognizes a health educator who has made a substantial contribution to advancing the field of health education or health promotion through research, program development, or program delivery. Israel, who co-leads the community engagement core of the NIEHS-funded Lifestage Exposures and Adult Disease Center at the University of Michigan, was recognized for her work with the Detroit Urban Research Center and other community-based groups to address a range of environmental health issues affecting Michigan residents.


  • Awards
  • CDC Foundation
lady looking at a blue tube with DNA graphic in the foreground
Early-career Researchers Celebrated in New Speaker Series

March 22, 2022

A webinar series showcasing the research and accomplishments of early-stage investigators from all 26 NIEHS Environmental Health Sciences (EHS) Core Centers launched January 12. “We take career development and providing resources for early-stage investigators very seriously,” said Claudia Thompson, Ph.D., EHS Core Center Program director. “Supporting them is a central part of what we try to do within the Core Centers program, and through these webinars, we hope to foster cross-center collaborations and networking.” In the inaugural session, Cetewayo Rashid, Ph.D., an assistant professor at the University of Kentucky, discussed his research into the health effects of an organophosphate flame retardant. He is affiliated with the university’s Center for Appalachian Research in Environmental Sciences. Joseph Romano, Ph.D., a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Pennsylvania, shared his work to advance toxicological research through artificial intelligence. He is affiliated with the university’s Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology. Check out and register for future webinars at the Early Stage Investigator Spotlight Webinar Series webpage.


  • Career Development
  • NIEHS Environmental Factor
University of Pennsylvania students and researchers participate in soil workshops held in Philadelphia communities
(Photo courtesy of Marilyn Howarth)
Considering Socioeconomic Factors When Predicting Risk of Lead Exposure

March 01, 2022

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania’s NIEHS-funded Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology developed an index to predict risk of lead exposure. The index is unique in that it considers socioeconomic and demographic factors in addition to environmental lead levels. “Our Lead Index helps to identify those with the greatest socioeconomic inequities who are also at highest risk of exposure to lead,” said Marilyn Howarth, M.D., who directs the Center’s Community Engagement Core. To determine lead levels throughout Philadelphia, researchers analyzed soil samples – including some collected by students and other community members. “Students and residents who are engaged through citizen science develop a deeper understanding of the hazards of lead in soil in their yards,” said Center researcher Richard Pepino, M.S.S., M.S. “When the effects feel personal, people are more determined to reduce their risk of harmful environmental exposures.”


  • Community Engagement
  • NIEHS Partnerships for Environmental Public Health
Child playing on the swings
Why Neighborhoods Matter: Brain Development in Children

February 28, 2022

In an NIEHS podcast, Megan Herting, Ph.D., discussed her research showing that children from neighborhoods characterized by poverty and unemployment had declines in cognitive performance and even brain size compared to kids from wealthier neighborhoods. Herting, who is a member of the NIEHS-funded Southern California Environmental Health Science Center at the University of Southern California, talked about why neighborhood quality matters when it comes to brain development and shared how we can promote neighborhood equity to improve children’s health.


  • News & Media
  • Partnerships for Environmental Public Health
James Keck in front of his truck
Wastewater-based Epidemiology Comes of Age During Pandemic

February 14, 2022

Environmental Health Sciences Core Center (EHS Core Center) researchers stood out at a December 2021 webinar focused on wastewater-based epidemiology. This wastewater surveillance approach provides a noninvasive, cost-effective way to track COVID-19 prevalence and spread in populations. Katrina Korfmacher, Ph.D., of the University of Rochester EHS Core Center, noted that at the start of the pandemic, historically disadvantaged communities in upstate New York were disproportionately affected by the virus. “We thought wastewater monitoring in communities with low testing rates could counteract inequities in the pandemic response by determining where resources were needed,” said Korfmacher, who directs the Center’s Community Engagement Core. James Keck, M.D., a member of the University of Kentucky EHS Core Center, spoke about a project exploring the feasibility of wastewater surveillance in rural populations where clinical testing is limited. “By sampling populations, wastewater-based epidemiology complements individual clinical testing,” noted Keck. “We don’t rely on people either choosing to get tested or having access to testing, so we aren’t missing pockets of the community.” To learn more about EHS Core Center efforts using wastewater-based epidemiology to bolster COVID-19 surveillance, read this July 2021 Center Spotlight Story and listen to this December 2021 podcast featuring Korfmacher.


  • Science Highlights
  • NIEHS Environmental Factor
Grantee Research
Phthalate Exposure Linked to Early Death

February 08, 2022

NIEHS-funded researchers reported that exposure to phthalates may be associated with increased mortality among U.S. adults. Leonardo Trasande, M.D., director of the NIEHS-funded Center for the Investigation of Environmental Hazards at New York University, led the study, which was selected as a January 2022 NIEHS Extramural Paper of the Month. Phthalates are chemicals found in many consumer products, particularly plastic food packaging and scented personal care products and cleaners. The researchers found that phthalate exposure may contribute to more than 90,000 premature deaths a year among people aged 55 to 64. They estimated those deaths could cost the U.S. up to $47 billion each year in lost economic productivity. According to the authors, study results demonstrate that there is an urgent need for strategies to reduce exposures to these harmful contaminants.


  • Publications
  • NIEHS Environmental Factor
Blue sky with the sun shining
After Two Hours, Sunscreen That Includes Zinc Oxide Loses Effectiveness, Becomes Toxic

January 14, 2022

Sunscreen that includes zinc oxide, a common ingredient, may lose much of its effectiveness and become toxic after two hours of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, according to a study led by Robyn Tanguay, Ph.D. Tanguay directs the NIEHS-funded Environmental Health Sciences Core Center at Oregon State University. “Sunscreens are important consumer products that help to reduce UV exposures and thus skin cancer, but we do not know if the use of some sunscreen formulations may have unintended toxicity because of interactions between some ingredients and UV light,” said Tanguay.


  • Publications
  • Oregon State University News
Storm clouds and rain, a red tornado, clouds with storm and fire - Disaster Preparedness Toolkit for Older Adults - Make a Plan, Have a Disaster Kit, Be Prepared
UK-CARES Collaborates to Offer Disaster Preparedness Toolkit for Older Adults

January 11, 2022

Members of the NIEHS-funded University of Kentucky Center for Appalachian Research in Environmental Sciences (UK-CARES) worked with community partners to develop a toolkit to help older adults prepare for disasters. The toolkit contains several handy documents including a disaster kit checklist, tools to document medical needs and health issues, a family communication plan, and a brief video made especially for seniors. “Our Appalachian residents can experience extreme hardship during these disasters,” said Erin Haynes, Dr.P.H., UK-CARES deputy director. “This project utilizes combined expertise and resources from across the Commonwealth to help Kentuckians who are most at need when disaster strikes.”


  • Community Engagement
  • UK-CARES
How to survive a heatwave infographic
Students Help Create Resource on Heat and Health

January 04, 2022

An eye-catching infographic teaches clinicians and the public about the health impacts of extreme heat. Local high school students translated the resource into Chinese – it is also available in Spanish. The effort was funded by the Environmental Research and Translation for Health Center at University of California, San Francisco.


  • Community Engagement
  • UCSF Environmental Research and Translation for Health Center
Clare Cannon, Ph.D.
Community-engaged Research Showcased in NIEHS-funded Film

December 09, 2021

A documentary titled “Air, Water, Blood: The Power of Community-engaged Research,” funded through an NIEHS grant, features the work of Clare Cannon, Ph.D. She uses a community-based participatory research approach to address environmental health concerns of residents living in Kettleman City, California. The film shows how Cannon and her partners in the community brought attention to the potential negative health effects of a hazardous waste landfill located in the majority Latino, primarily Spanish-speaking town. The documentary was broadcast at the American Public Health Association Public Health Film Festival October 24 – 27. Cannon’s work was supported through a pilot grant from the NIEHS-funded Environmental Health Sciences Center at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis). A sociologist by training, Cannon tapped the expertise of researchers from other disciplines at the UC Davis Environmental Exposure Core. They identified pollutants in the town’s air, analyzed residential water for benzene and arsenic, and tested blood samples from community participants for polychlorinated biphenyls. “Centers like the one at Davis really matter,” said Cannon. “Without linking partners, researchers, expertise, and the equipment of core investigators, this work can’t happen. Our transdisciplinary approach will become increasingly important to protect vulnerable communities experiencing environmental injustice, particularly as we see more climate change effects.” Learn more about the project in the December 2021 Environmental Factor article.


  • Community Engagement
  • NIEHS Environmental Factor
Ellen Hahn, Ph.D.
Hahn Receives Prestigious Nursing Science Award

November 16, 2021

Ellen J. Hahn, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, received the prestigious 2021 Faye Glenn Abdellah Leadership Award, Oct. 6, from the Friends of the National Institute of Nursing Research. Hahn, who directs the NIEHS-funded University of Kentucky Center for Appalachian Research in Environmental Sciences, conducts community-engaged research in rural Kentucky to reduce lung cancer risk related to co-exposures of tobacco smoke and radon.


  • Awards
  • UK-CARES
faucet filling a glass with water
PFAS Exposure May Increase Diabetes Risk in Latina Adolescents

November 03, 2021

Exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) may increase risk of type 2 diabetes in Latina girls, according to new research led by Leda Chatzi, M.D., Ph.D., deputy director of the NIEHS-funded Southern California Environmental Health Sciences Center. “Type 2 diabetes is potentially preventable, and one key area of focus should be environmental influences,” said Chatzi.


  • Publications
  • NIEHS Environmental Factor
woman holding a plastic bag filled with soil
EPA Funds Emory Project to Measure Environmental Contaminants, Exposures in West Atlanta

November 03, 2021

With funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Emory University researchers will work with members of the West Atlanta community to better understand children’s exposures to lead and other environmental chemicals. Led by HERCULES Exposome Research Center members Eri Saikawa, Ph.D., and Dana Boyd Barr, Ph.D., the team will analyze environmental samples, such as soil and house dust, and biological samples from children, such as blood, to identify exposure risks in the area. They will also develop strategies to reduce harmful exposures among the children. “A key part of this project is strong engagement with the community,” said Saikawa. The researchers will work with residents to learn their needs and concerns and communicate findings as the project proceeds. The project grew out of a community-based pilot study funded by the HERCULES Center in which Saikawa and team discovered high lead levels in the soil of some West Atlanta residences.


  • Community Engagement
  • Emory News
four volunteers with computers in shopping cart poses for photo
New Paths for Community Connection in Detroit

October 01, 2021

The NIEHS-funded Center for Urban Responses to Environmental Stressors (CURES) Community Engagement Core (CEC) at Wayne State University has a history of engaging about 500 Detroit residents annually in face-to-face events to disseminate information about environmental health science.


  • Community Engagement
  • Wayne State University
USC Environmental Health study team discusses project
Bridging the Gap on Environmental Health Using the Expertise of Community Health Workers

September 22, 2021

The University of Southern California Environmental Health Centers and the Urban and Environmental Policy Institute at Occidental College are working with community health workers, also known as promotoras, to:
  • Document health disparities.
  • Build a community-driven environmental research agenda.
  • Address neighborhood-level concerns in south Los Angeles.
This public health-centered approach enhances promotora understanding of the research process to achieve health equity and inform social justice. Promotoras receive training in human subject protections, survey administration, physiological measurements, and sample collection for biomonitoring of environmental exposures. The promotoras leverage their trusted partnerships and apply this knowledge within their communities. As such, the promotoras provide a vital link in community-directed data collection and dissemination of public health information. They help ensure that community members are engaged and represented in health studies and have access to health intervention resources.


  • Community Engagement
  • USC Environmental Health Centers
Natalie Sampson, smiling outside
Natalie Sampson, Ph.D. – Building Capacity in Community Science to Address Environmental Inequalities

September 21, 2021

Natalie Sampson, Ph.D., works with communities and local government in Southeast Michigan to plan and evaluate program, policy, and land-use interventions to improve health equity. Sampson is a co-leader of the Community Engagement Core at the Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD). The center facilitates multi-directional interaction between center researchers, policy makers, and communities. Read more about her work on social and environmental determinants of health, as well as the Environmental Health Research-to-Action Youth Academy that builds intergenerational capacity in community science and policy advocacy to address environment racism.


  • Community Engagement
  • Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD)
Luz Huntington-Moskos, Ph.D.
Luz Huntington-Moskos, Ph.D. – Partnering With Youth to Support Environmental Health Literacy in the Next Generation

September 21, 2021

Luz Huntington-Moskos, Ph.D., is empowering youth to positively impact their communities with the Community Engagement Core at University of Louisville’s Center for Integrative Environmental Health Sciences. As the Community Engagement Core director, she aims to improve environmental health literacy across western Kentucky including the Louisville area. She tailors communication methods to specific communities and promotes the relevance of center resources to community environmental health. Read how Huntington-Moskos works to make science available and accessible through effective communication and youth engagement in western Kentucky communities.


  • Community Engagement
  • University of Louisville’s Center for Integrative Environmental Health Sciences
men collecting sewage samples beside a manhole
Wastewater and COVID-19

July 13, 2021

As COVID-19 spreads, multiple NIEHS-supported researchers have been tracking and mitigating infections using wastewater-based epidemiology. NIEHS-funded researchers are using this methodology to trace and reduce COVID-19 exposures on campuses, nursing homes, and rural areas.


  • Community Engagement
  • NIEHS
Angela Reyes
Angela Reyes – Addressing Air Pollution Effects With Multidisciplinary Matchups

July 06, 2021

Angela Reyes, M.P.H., is working to address racial inequity and health disparities to build healthier communities in Southwest Detroit. Reyes is the founder and current executive director of the Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation (DHDC), an organization committed to building healthy and safe communities, particularly for Hispanic populations in southwest Detroit. It provides opportunities for self-empowerment and education for disadvantaged youth and families. DHDC and M-LEEaD are addressing the air quality problem by participating in the Community Action to Promote Healthy Environments, a partnership among community-based organizations and academic institutions. These groups have worked together to document air pollutant levels, sources, and distribution and quantify health impacts and inequities to develop a Public Health Action Plan.


  • News & Media
  • Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation (DHDC)
Anjum Hajat
Hajat Is Investigating the Intersection of Psychosocial and Environmental Stressors

April 02, 2021

Anjum Hajat, Ph.D. investigates the intersection of air pollution and psychosocial stressors, and how they affect health outcomes. Her research suggests that individuals who suffer from stressors, such as poverty and neighborhood disadvantage, in conjunction with air pollution exposure, have more adverse health outcomes, such as cardiovascular disease.


  • Science Highlights
  • University of Washington Center for Exposures, Diseases, Genomics, and Environment (EDGE)
Drone presentation
USA Drone Port, UK-CARES and Kentucky Homeplace Partner to Bring PPE to Rural Kentuckians

March 09, 2021

Through a Rapid Response Mini-Grant for COVID-19, the Community Engagement Core at the University of Kentucky Center for Appalachian Research in Environmental Sciences (UK-CARES) is testing the use of drones to deliver personal protective equipment to high-risk Appalachia communities. This collaborative pilot project unites drone pilots with community health workers to assist the Kentucky River District’s most vulnerable community members who are isolated during the pandemic. If successful, this project could bridge the supply gap rural communities are facing during the COVID-19 pandemic as well as streamline the way environmental sampling is conducted for future environmental health studies.


  • News & Media
  • University of Kentucky Center for Appalachian Research in Environmental Sciences
Melossa Smarr, Ph.D.
Smarr Advances Environmental Health Science From a Broader Perspective

February 08, 2021

Since we last caught up with Melissa Smarr, Ph.D., at the HERCULES Center, she has become a health scientist administrator for the NIEHS Population Health Branch of the Division of Extramural Research and Training. Smarr says she has been interested in the various aspects of research administration since she was doctoral student. Her current position provides opportunity to address emerging areas of research from a broader perspective. Smarr also noted that science communication is an exciting part of her research journey.


  • Career Development
  • NIEHS
Timothy Moran
Moran Studies the Effect of Indoor Environmental Factors on Food Allergy Development

November 12, 2020

Timothy Moran, M.D., Ph.D., is investigating the role of environmental factors in food allergy development. His research suggests that food allergies may be caused in part by environmental exposures, rather than purely by genetics. His research centers on the question of whether there is a difference in the indoor environment of children with peanut allergies and the indoor environment of those without a peanut allergy.


  • Science Highlights
  • UNC Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility
Anna Goodman Hoover, Ph.D.
Assessing Community Knowledge about Water Quality to Improve Health

March 30, 2020

Anna Goodman Hoover, Ph.D., is assessing Appalachian Kentuckians’ water-related environmental health literacy. She says that providing residents with useful information to protect their health first requires understanding their knowledge and perceptions of water-related issues. The project is supported by a pilot grant from the University of Kentucky Center for Appalachian Research in Environmental Sciences (UK-CARES), which is funded by NIEHS.


  • Career Development
  • UK-CARES
Melossa Smarr, Ph.D.
Smarr is the First to Examine Whether Using a Common Pain Relief Drug During Pregnancy Affects Fetal Growth

March 25, 2020

Melissa Smarr, Ph.D., was featured in Pediatrics Research for her work examining the effects of acetaminophen use during pregnancy on fetal growth. Her study is the first to investigate this link. Smarr is a member of the NIEHS-funded HERCULES Exposome Research Center at Emory University.


  • Career Development
  • HERCULES Exposome Research Center
Lauren Petrick, Ph.D.
Petrick Expands Metabolomics Research with Core Center Support

February 04, 2020

Lauren Petrick, Ph.D., identifies how molecular signatures in the body can tell a more complete story about prenatal and neonatal chemical exposures. She is a member of the NIEHS-funded Mount Sinai Transdisciplinary Center on Early Environmental Exposures.


  • Career Development
  • Mount Sinai Transdisciplinary Center on Early Environmental Exposures
Malden Works Team (2019)
A Revitalized Riverfront in Malden is Underway Thanks to Leventhal City Prize

December 17, 2019

Led by NIEHS grantee Kathleen Vandiver, Ph.D., a team of environmental advocates, community leaders, and government officials will create a public space along the Malden River in Massachusetts to improve community health and recreation opportunities. The effort is funded by the Norman B. Leventhal City Prize.


  • Awards
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Environmental Health Sciences
Marti Lindsey, Ph.D.
Lindsey Honored as the Michael A. Cusanovich Arizona Bioscience Educator of the Year

November 22, 2019

Marti Lindsey, Ph.D., was named the Michael A. Cusanovich Arizona Bioscience Educator of the Year, an award honoring educators who demonstrate leadership and creativity to engage students in life sciences. Lindsey ’s work spans more than 18 years at the University of Arizona (UAZ), where she directs the Community Engagement Core in the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center.


  • Awards
  • UAZ Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center
Picture of young woman vaping and blowing out smoke
University of Rochester Researchers Discuss Vaping-Related Lung Injury on the Today Show

October 26, 2019

University of Rochester Environmental Health Sciences Center members Daniel Croft, M.D., M.P.H., and Irfan Rahman, Ph.D., were featured on a Today Show segment about vaping-related lung injury. In the segment, Rahman is shown working in his lab while Croft discussed the symptoms associated with this condition. Rahman uses cell, mouse, and human studies to investigate how flavoring chemicals used in vaping devices affect lung health. He also analyzes vaping liquid collected from patients and hospitals around the world to better understand its chemical makeup. Croft, a clinician researcher who focuses on inhalation toxicology, helps interpret the clinical relevance of findings from the lab and collaborates on a study to better understand respiratory effects in people who vape.


  • News & Media
  • University of Rochester Environmental Health Sciences Center
The book cover for
New Book Examines Collaboration to Address Environmental Health Issues

October 24, 2019

A new book, “Bridging Silos: Collaborating for Environmental Health and Justice in Urban Communities,” examines ways that community groups, government agencies, academic institutions, and private institutions can collaborate to address environmental health disparities. Written by Katrina Smith Korfmacher, Ph.D., of the University of Rochester Environmental Health Sciences Center, the book presents in-depth studies of three efforts to address long-standing environmental health issues: childhood lead poisoning in Rochester, New York; unhealthy built environments in Duluth, Minnesota; and pollution related to commercial ports and international trade in Southern California. The book is available for free download through MIT Press's Open Access initiative.


  • Publications
  • University of Rochester Environmental Health Sciences Center
The Emory study team collects soil samples at a HWG garden site
A Community-Engaged Pilot Study Leads to EPA Site Investigation

October 01, 2019

Emory University’s HERCULES Exposome Research Center funded a community-engaged study to investigate urban soil contamination in Atlanta, Georgia. The study led to an U.S. Environmental Protection Agency site investigation. This outcome shows how engaging communities in studies may strengthen science and expand its impact.


  • Community Engagement
  • Emory University HERCULES Exposome Research Center
Headshot of John Meeker, Sc.D.
(Photo courtesy of UM School of Public Health)
Meeker Discusses PFAS in Food on NPR

September 17, 2019

John Meeker, Sc.D., talks about food as a source of exposure to perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) on Issues of the Environment, a weekly radio segment on Eastern Michigan’s National Public Radio (NPR) station. Meeker is deputy director of the Core Center at the University of Michigan (UM) and a project leader at the UM Children's Environmental Health Center.


  • News & Media
  • Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD)
o	Iowa Public Meeting Tackles Water Quality, Farming, Health
Iowa Public Meeting Tackles Water Quality, Farming, Health

September 10, 2019

A community forum, sponsored by the University of Iowa Core Center, included farm tours and a public meeting for NIEHS scientists, core center colleagues, and community members. At the forum, NIEHS and National Toxicology Program Director Linda Birnbaum, Ph.D., and others answered questions from the community about water quality, pesticides, cancer, and more.


  • Community Engagement
  • Environmental Factor
UC Davis wildfire
UC Davis Wildfire Research Featured on Local News

August 30, 2019

On a local TV news segment, scientists with the University of California, Davis Core Center discuss their research to examine the health effects of the 2018 Camp Fire. The segment features Center Director, Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Ph.D., who studies the long-term health effects of wildfires, and center member Rebecca Schmidt, Ph.D., who studies how exposures from the wildfire may affect the health of pregnant women and their babies.


  • News & Media
  • Fox 40
graphic of internal organs, with liver area shaded red
DNA Repair Enzyme Reduces Development of Liver Cancer

August 13, 2019

University of Cincinnati (UC) researchers discovered that an enzyme involved in repairing damaged DNA also reduced the development of liver tumors in mice. Study results may help scientists develop new ways to treat liver cancer.


  • Publications
  • UC Center for Environmental Genetics
Peter Thorne, Ph.D.
EHSRC Director Peter Thorne Talks About State-of-the-Art Lab in New Video

June 07, 2019

In a one-minute video, Peter Thorne, Ph.D., director of the Environmental Health Sciences Research Center (EHSRC) at the University of Iowa, talks about how a new state-of-the-art lab will advance Center research and facilitate scientific collaboration.


  • News & Media
  • University of Iowa EHSRC
Gail Garbowski
Gail Garbowski on Four Decades at Columbia University, Including 22 Years with the CEHNM

June 04, 2019

Gail Garbowski, administrator of the Columbia University Center for Environmental Health in Northern Manhattan (CEHNM), is featured in a news story highlighting her four decades of work at Columbia University – including 22 years with the CEHNM. As CEHNM administrator, Garbowski organizes events, monitors the budget, prepares grant reports, and translates Center research findings so they can be understood by community members.


  • News & Media
  • Columbia University CEHNM
person vaping
UNC Video Communicates Vaping Research and Risks

May 24, 2019

A new video highlights research while urging caution regarding the use of e-cigarettes and vaping. The video was produced by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility.


  • News & Media
  • UNC Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility
Tamarra James-Todd
Core Center as a Launchpad for James-Todd’s Research Career

May 15, 2019

Tamarra James-Todd, Ph.D., investigates how exposure to environmental chemicals might affect maternal health during pregnancy and contribute to disease later in life. James-Todd has utilized a variety of resources provided by the Harvard Chan-NIEHS Center for Environmental Health to advance her research career.


  • Career Development
  • Harvard Chan-NIEHS Center for Environmental Health
Irfan Rahman
Irfan Rahman Designated an American Thoracic Society Fellow

May 02, 2019

The American Thoracic Society (ATS) designated Irfan Rahman, Ph.D., an ATS Fellow for his research on chronic lung inflammatory diseases. Rahman is a member of the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) Environmental Health Sciences Center.


  • Career Development
  • URMC Environmental Health Sciences Center
Tour guide speaking to group outdoors
UC Davis Documentary Highlights Environmental Justice Tour

May 02, 2019

A new documentary provides a firsthand look at a tour of communities affected by industrial development in California’s San Joaquin Valley. The tour was organized by members of the Environmental Health Sciences Center at the University of California, Davis.


  • News & Media
  • UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences Center
Community Briefing Educates Women About Chemicals in Cosmetics and Personal Care Products
Community Briefing Educates Women About Chemicals in Cosmetics and Personal Care Products

April 12, 2019

Nearly 50 community members met with staff from Columbia University and WE ACT for Environmental Justice to learn about possible health risks from harmful chemicals found in cosmetics and personal care products.


  • Community Engagement
  • Columbia Center for Environmental Health in Northern Manhattan
semi truck in gas station parking lot at sunset
Gas Stations Vent Far More Toxic Fumes Than Previously Thought

April 09, 2019

A study led by Markus Hilpert, Ph.D., found that emissions from gas station vent pipes, which contain the carcinogenic chemical benzene, were ten times higher than estimates used in setback regulations that determine how close schools, playgrounds, and parks can be located to these facilities. The findings support the need to revisit regulations on setback distances for gas stations, which are based on 20-year-old estimates of emissions. Hilpert is a member of the Center for Environmental Health in Northern Manhattan at Columbia University.


  • Science Highlights
  • Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health News
Scott Langevin
CEG Member Langevin Awarded New Grant from the American Cancer Society

April 03, 2019

The American Cancer Society awarded Scott Langevin, Ph.D., a $782,000 grant for his research using a mouth rinse test to detect mouth and throat cancers in their earliest stages. He credits his early career support from the University of Cincinnati (UC) Center for Environmental Genetics (CEG) for helping him get the grant.


  • Career Development
  • UC Center for Environmental Genetics
Croft accepts the ATS David Bates Award with mentors, Mark Utell Utell and Mark Frampton
Croft Receives ATS Award for Air Pollution Research

March 25, 2019

The American Thoracic Society (ATS) awarded Daniel Croft, M.D., the David Bates Award for the best submitted abstract in the field of environmental or occupational health at the ATS 2018 International Conference. Croft is a member of the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) Environmental Health Sciences Center.


  • Awards
  • URMC Environmental Health Sciences Center
Jeremy Sarnat, Sc.D.
Metabolomics for Identifying New Traffic Pollutant Exposure Markers

March 25, 2019

Researchers from Emory University are investigating what traffic-related air pollutants people are exposed to and the health effects that might occur as a result.


  • Science Highlights
  • HERCULES Exposome Research Center
woman holding video camera
Waking Up to Wildfires Film Makes World Premiere

February 26, 2019

On November 4, 2018, more than 250 people packed a theater in Sonoma, California for the world premiere of “Waking Up to Wildfires.” The documentary was funded in part by NIEHS through a grant to the University of California Davis Environmental Health Sciences Core Center.


  • News & Media
  • NIEHS Environmental Factor
smiling girl against orange background
Early-Life Metal Exposures Linked to Children’s Behavior Problems

February 25, 2019

NIEHS-funded researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai reported that early-life metal exposures, as measured in baby teeth, were associated with behavioral problems in children, and the associations were dependent upon developmental timing of exposure. According to the authors, these findings suggest that the developing brain is uniquely vulnerable to metal exposures at different timepoints.


  • Publications
  • NIEHS Environmental Factor
Map where a student documented her daily exposure to high levels of air pollution on her bus ride to school
Los Angeles Youths Take on Air Monitoring

February 07, 2019

Los Angeles students in communities of color recorded air quality on their daily routes and created story maps of their experiences in an innovative project called "A Day in the Life.” The project was made possible by the Southern California Environmental Health Center and community partners.


  • Community Engagement
  • Environmental Factor
Marissa Sobolewski working at computer
Sobolewski Credits Core Center for Research Career in Environmental Toxicology

February 06, 2019

Marissa Sobolewski, Ph.D., is an assistant professor and toxicologist at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC). She says the URMC Environmental Health Sciences Center has been influential in her transition into the field of environmental health science.


  • Career Development
  • URMC Environmental Health Sciences Center
Robert Blount
Blount Studies Effects of Air Pollution on Tuberculosis in Vietnam

December 13, 2018

Robert Blount, M.D., a physician scientist at the University of Iowa Environmental Health Sciences Research Center (EHSRC), studies how exposure to air pollution affects tuberculosis risk and the body’s immune response to the lung infection.


  • Career Development
  • University of Iowa EHSRC
Brandon Pearson
Pearson Explores How Environmental Exposures Harm the Brain

November 26, 2018

Brandon Pearson, Ph.D., studies the role genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors play in the development of brain disorders at the Center for Environmental Health in Northern Manhattan (CEHNM) at Columbia University.


  • Career Development
  • Columbia University CEHNM
Emily Liu
Climate LEAP Alumna Receives 2017 President’s Environmental Youth Award

November 14, 2018

High school senior Emily Liu was awarded the President’s Environmental Youth Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for her project focused on air quality and renewable energy. Liu’s project was inspired by her involvement in the Climate Leadership and Energy Awareness Program (Climate LEAP), which is funded in part by the Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility (CEHS) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


  • Awards
  • UNC CEHS
Carrie Breton, Sc.D.
Carrie Breton Discusses Air Pollution and Children’s Health on Science Friday

November 07, 2018

Carrie Breton, Sc.D., answered questions about how exposure to air pollution during pregnancy can affect fetal development on a September 2018 episode of Science Friday.


  • News & Media
  • SCEHS Center
Zelieann Craig, Ph.D.
Young Investigator Expands Phthalate Studies with Core Center Support

October 19, 2018

Zelieann Craig, Ph.D., is an early-stage investigator examining the effects of phthalate exposure on reproduction and infertility. She is a member of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center at the University of Arizona.


  • Career Development
  • UAZ SWEHSC
CURES at Wayne State University
New Video Raises Awareness of Detroit’s Environmental Health Issues

September 17, 2018

A new video highlights how NIEHS grantees are raising awareness of the environmental health issues in Detroit. The video was created by the Center for Urban Responses to Environmental Stressors (CURES) at Wayne State University.


  • Community Engagement
  • CURES
Dr. Catherine Karr and child
Catherine Karr Praised for Contributions to Improving Children’s Health in The Lancet

August 22, 2018

Catherine Karr, M.D., Ph.D., is working to improve children’s health using a community engaged approach. A recent article in The Lancet lauds her for her accomplishments.


  • Awards
  • UW EDGE Center
e-cigarette
Testing the Safety of Cinnamon Flavoring in E-Cigarettes

August 17, 2018

In a study done on the health effects of e-cigarette flavoring, researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) find that compounds that are safe to eat may have harmful effects on the lung’s defense system when inhaled.


  • Science Highlights
  • UNC CEHS
fracking
Early-Life Exposure to Fracking Chemicals May Damage Immune System

August 09, 2018

Maternal exposure to chemicals used in unconventional oil and gas extraction, also known as fracking, affected immune system function in mice, according to a new study by NIEHS grantees from the University of Rochester Medical Center.


  • Publications
  • NIEHS Paper of the Month
multigenerational family of women
Pregnancy Drug DES Might Have Triggered ADHD In the Grandchildren of Women Who Used It

July 26, 2018

Grandchildren of women who used the pregnancy drug diethylstilbestrol (DES), a known endocrine disruptor, have elevated odds for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a new study funded in part by NIEHS. The study is the first to provide evidence of the potential neurodevelopmental consequences of exposure to endocrine disruptors across generations in humans. The study was a collaborative effort involving investigators from the EHS Core Centers at Columbia University and Harvard University.


  • Publications
  • EurekAlert!
Gary Miller
HERCULES Center Director Gary Miller Featured on Big Picture Science

July 26, 2018

HERCULES Center Director Gary Miller, Ph.D., answered questions about the exposome and why it matters to human health on a recent episode of Big Picture Science, a weekly radio show and podcast of the SETI Institute.


  • News & Media
  • HERCULES Exposome Research Center
Judith Zelikoff smiling
Judith Zelikoff Receives SOT Education Award

June 04, 2018

Judith Zelikoff, Ph.D., received the 2018 Society of Toxicology (SOT) Education Award for her significant contributions to toxicology education. She is director of the Community Engagement Core within the New York University (NYU) Environmental Health Sciences Core Center.


  • Awards
  • NYU Environmental Health Sciences Core Center
Dana Dolinoy smiling in her lab
Dana Dolinoy Receives Achievement Award from SOT

June 04, 2018

Dana Dolinoy, Ph.D., deputy director of the University of Michigan Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD) Center, received the 2018 Achievement Award from the Society of Toxicology (SOT) for her work to understand how nutritional and environmental factors influence epigenetic gene regulation, and how early life exposures can lead to disease later in life.


  • Awards
  • M-LEEaD Center
DNA twisting in a double helix
Cadmium Exposure Linked to Epigenetic Disruption at DNA Regulatory Regions

June 04, 2018

Researchers from the North Carolina State University Center for Human Health and the Environment, identified hotspots in the human genome that are susceptible to epigenetic changes after cadmium exposure. The research provides clues about how cadmium exposure causes disease.


  • Publications
  • NCSU Center for Human Health and the Environment
Natalia Orlovsky pointing to a poster board
High School Scientist at NIEHS-funded Program Wins Big

May 22, 2018

A high school senior won $175,000 in prize money at a science research competition for her study on the health effects of e-cigarettes. The student, Natalia Orlovsky, collaborated with Jeffrey Field, Ph.D., who directs the Teen Research and Education and Environmental Science (TREES) program, which is a part of the Center for Excellence in Environmental Toxicology at the University of Pennsylvania.


  • Awards
  • NIEHS Environmental Factor
microscopic cells
Lung Stem Cells Repair Airways After Injury

May 22, 2018

University of Iowa (UI) researchers have identified a new population of lung stem cells that appear to be important for repairing the airway following severe injury. The finding may help develop treatments for airway diseases, such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. Funded in part by the UI Environmental Health Science Research Center, the research aligns with the Center’s focus on environmental lung disease. (Photo courtesy of Cell Stem Cell)


  • Publications
  • EurekAlert! Science News
Two researchers from Wayne State University standing in a lab
CURES Center Member Wins “AI for Earth” Award to Address Environmental Issues

May 22, 2018

A team of Wayne State University (WSU) researchers have received the “AI for Earth” Azure Award from Microsoft. The award will provide WSU researchers access to innovative data science, spatial analysis, and visualization tools to examine how pollutants contaminate Michigan water supplies.


  • Science Highlights
  • Wayne State University
Long haul trucks on a highway road
Rutgers Community Engagement Core Helps Improve Air Near Schools

May 01, 2018

With help from the Rutgers University Community Engagement Core, residents of Elizabeth, New Jersey launched a project to collect data on truck traffic and air pollution. They identified two locations along walking routes to local schools where more than 60 trucks passed per hour, leading to increased amounts of air pollution. Based on these results, Elizabeth now prohibits truck traffic on a portion of that route.


  • Community Engagement
  • NIEHS Environmental Factor
An aerial shot of New York City
Use of Dirty Heating Oil in NYC Concentrated Uptown

May 01, 2018

Columbia University researchers conducted interviews with New York City (NYC) building owners, policy makers, and bank lenders to shed light on why some residential buildings in Northern Manhattan continue to burn fuels that produce high levels of air pollution, despite incentives to switch to cleaner fuels. The researchers proposed greater financial incentives and other changes to the NYC Clean Heat Program to encourage more buildings to use natural gas.


  • Science Highlights
  • EurekAlert! Science News
teens walking in a park
Green Space May Lead to Less Depressed Teens

February 20, 2018

Adolescents living in areas surrounded by trees and other green vegetation have better mental health than those exposed to less greenery at home, according to new research supported in part by the EHS Core Center at Harvard University. The study is one of the first to examine the relationship between natural environments and depressive symptoms in adolescents.


  • Science Highlights
  • Harvard University
Adolescent girls
Air Pollution Linked to Irregular Menstrual Cycles

February 20, 2018

Air pollution may cause teenage girls to have irregular menstrual cycles, according to a study funded in part through the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Center for EHS pilot project program. The study is the first to show that exposure to air pollution among teen girls is associated with slightly increased chances of menstrual irregularity and longer time to achieve such regularity in high school and early adulthood.


  • Science Highlights
  • EurekAlert! Science News
young girl lying on a coach
Prenatal Exposure to Flame Retardants Alters Serotonin Production in Rats by Disrupting Placental Function

February 20, 2018

Research from North Carolina State University’s Center for Human Health and the Environment suggests that prenatal exposure to flame retardant chemicals commonly used in furniture and baby products may hinder healthy brain development. The researchers found that the flame retardant chemical disrupts normal placental function in rats, leading to altered production of the neurotransmitter serotonin.


  • Science Highlights
  • NC State News
drain pipe
Researchers Study GenX Exposure in North Carolina Residents

February 20, 2018

Researchers from North Carolina State University’s Center for Human Health and the Environment are leading a collaborative project to study GenX exposure among residents of New Hanover County, North Carolina. The community-based project will test blood, urine, and drinking water samples from 400 participants for GenX and related chemicals.


  • Science Highlights
  • NC State News
Heidi Hsieh
Heidi Hsieh Receives Early Career Professional Award from the American College of Toxicology

February 20, 2018

Heidi Hsieh, Ph.D., a former doctoral student in the Center for Environmental Genetics (CEG) at the University of Cincinnati (UC), was honored with the 2017 Early Career Professional Award from the American College of Toxicology. While at UC, Hsieh worked with CEG member Mary Beth Genter, Ph.D., to examine the mechanism of zinc toxicity in olfactory neurons. She is now a study director at Covance Laboratories, Inc. in Madison, Wisconsin.


  • Awards
  • University of Cincinnati
Chester Quilt
Patching Together Art and Environmental Health Equity with Chester City Youth

November 15, 2017

Working with the University of Pennsylvania Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology Community Engagement Core (CEC), a group of high school students created an environmental health equity quilt to express their concerns about environmental injustice in their community. The quilt was selected to be featured in the National Academy of Medicine’s nationwide community art project, Visualize Health Equity.


  • Community Engagement
  • Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology
Joel Kaufman posing for a photo
Joel Kaufman's Landmark Air Pollution Study Selected Best in 2016

November 09, 2017

NIEHS grantee Joel Kaufman, M.D., is lead author of the best environmental epidemiology paper published in 2016, according to the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE). The study shared significant findings from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution (MESA Air) about how exposure to air pollution can lead to cardiovascular disease. Kaufman is a member of the Interdisciplinary Center for Exposures, Diseases, Genomics and Environment (EDGE) at the University of Washington.


  • Awards
  • University of Washington School of Public Health
Students use kits provided by the CEC to analyze water samples in a ninth-grade science class.
University of Cincinnati Researchers Build Capacity for Student Scientists

October 24, 2017

University of Cincinnati Community Engagement Core members provide testing kits for eastern Ohio students to collect, sample, and analyze local water.


  • Community Engagement
  • University of Cincinnati
woman and child looking at smoke stacks from a distance
Drinking Water as a Source of Exposure to Industrial Chemicals in the Ohio River Valley

October 24, 2017

University of Cincinnati researchers found that some Mid-Ohio River Valley residents have higher amounts of the chemical polyfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in their bodies than most other Americans, and industrial releases to the Ohio River may be a major source of exposure.


  • Science Highlights
  • University of Cincinnati
Two smoke stacks billowing smoke into a clear, blue sky
Air Pollution from Climate Change Expected to Cause Premature Death

October 04, 2017

Research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill EHS Core Center estimates that future climate change, if left unaddressed, will significantly increase premature deaths associated with air pollution.


  • Science Highlights
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill News
A highway with heavy traffic and heavily polluted skyline in the distance
Nationwide Study of U.S. Seniors Strengthens Link Between Air Pollution and Premature Death

October 04, 2017

A study of 60 million Americans ages 65 and older shows that long-term exposure to airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone increases the risk of premature death, even when levels of these pollutants are below air quality standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to protect public health. The research was supported in part by the Harvard EHS Core Center.


  • Science Highlights
  • Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health News
Scientist analyzing tests
Aflatoxin Exposure Marker May Lead to Early Detection of Liver Cancer

July 12, 2017

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Environmental Health Sciences have developed a new way to use genetic sequencing to determine whether liver cells have been exposed to aflatoxin, a fungal product believed to cause up to 80 percent of liver cancer cases. This approach could be used to predict whether someone has a high risk of developing liver cancer, potentially many years before tumors actually appear.


  • Science Highlights
  • Environmental Factor
Jiu-Chiuan Chen, M.D., Sc.D.
Dementia Shows Gene-environment Link, Loss of Smell Is Early Sign

July 12, 2017

Scientists from the Southern California Environmental Health Science Center report dementia is linked to air pollution exposures combined with a certain genetic variation, and an impaired sense of smell may serve as an early warning sign. These findings provide public health experts with new insights to help battle Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and dementia.


  • Science Highlights
  • Environmental Factor
Person eating fish
Evidence Points to Fish Oil to Fight Asthma

July 12, 2017

Scientists have discovered how omega-3 fatty acids contained in fish oil could be used for asthma patients. The research team included members of the University of Rochester EHS Core Center.


  • Science Highlights
  • University of Rochester Medical Center
Woman with baby
Prenatal Lead Linked with Stunted Growth in Early Childhood

July 12, 2017

Researchers from the EHS Core Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai reported an association between higher maternal blood lead levels during the third trimester of pregnancy and stunted growth in their children. The study involved participants from the Programming Research in Obesity, Growth, Environment and Social Stressors (PROGRESS) cohort in Mexico City.


  • Science Highlights
  • Environmental Factor
Man giving a presentation
UC Davis Hosts First Academy Day

July 12, 2017

The first ever UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences Academy Day on March 21 brought together multi-disciplinary researchers and community-based organizations to discuss concerns about environmental health impacts, specifically those centered on water safety and contamination issues in the Central Valley of California.


  • Community Engagement
  • UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences Center
Information graphic depicting a network of people
Case Study Highlights How Community Partnerships Inform Research Translation

July 12, 2017

In a new publication, members from the EHS Core Center at the University of Michigan and a Stakeholder Advisory Board describe a case study in dialog between environmental health scientists and community members. The team emphasizes the benefits of community partnerships to develop educational tools for Detroit area residents.


  • Community Engagement
  • Partnerships for Environmental Public Health
Gutschow presented
Award-winning Resource Benefits Communities near Busy Roadways

July 12, 2017

The Community Engagement Core within the Southern California Environmental Health Science Center was recognized for their infographic describing the health risks of living near busy roads. The Transportation Research Board, part of the prestigious, National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, recognized the interactive infographic as part of an overall competition focused on communicating the link between transportation and public health.


  • Awards
  • Environmental Factor
star trophy
Deputy Director of the UPenn CEC Receives Netter Center Faculty-community Partnership Award

July 12, 2017

Professor Richard (Rich) Pepino, Deputy Director of the Community Engagement Core within the University of Pennsylvania EHS Core Center, and his partners in the School District of Philadelphia are this year’s recipients of the Netter Center Faculty-Community Partnership Award. The annual award recognizes outstanding Faculty-Community Partnership projects in Philadelphia.


  • Awards
  • Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology
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