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Your Environment. Your Health.

Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers

Scientific collaboration and cutting-edge technologies can advance environmental health sciences. The NIEHS Environmental Health Sciences (EHS) Core Centers Program facilitates these collaborations by funding institutional infrastructure to support scientific equipment, facilities, and other resources that can be shared among environmental health researchers. By pursuing shared research questions, the EHS Core Centers identify emerging issues that advance understanding about how pollutants and other environmental factors affect human biology and may lead to disease.

Currently, there are more than 20 centers across the country. Each center has its own strategic vision and scientific focus, but all share four common goals: advancing scientific research; promoting community engagement; advancing translational research; and training new researchers.

  • Image of young woman vaping outdoors and blowing out smoke

    University of Rochester Researchers Discuss Vaping-Related Lung Injury on the Today Show 

    University of Rochester Environmental Health Sciences Center members Daniel Croft, M.D., M.P.H., and Irfan Rahman, Ph.D., were featured on a Today Show segment about vaping-related lung injury. In the segment, Rahman is shown working in his lab while Croft discussed the symptoms associated with this condition.
  • The book cover for

    New Book Examines Collaboration to Address Environmental Health Issues

    A new book, “Bridging Silos: Collaborating for Environmental Health and Justice in Urban Communities,” examines ways that community groups, government agencies, academic institutions, and private institutions can collaborate to address environmental health disparities. Bridging Silos was written by Katrina Smith Korfmacher, Ph.D., of the University of Rochester Environmental Health Sciences Center.
  • The Emory study team collects soil samples at a HWG garden

    A Community-Engaged Pilot Study Leads to EPA Site Investigation

    Emory University’s HERCULES Exposome Research Center funded a community-engaged study to investigate urban soil contamination in Atlanta, Georgia. The study led to an U.S. Environmental Protection Agency site investigation. This outcome shows how engaging communities in studies may strengthen science and expand its impact.
  • Headshot of John Meeker, Sc.D.

    Meeker Discusses PFAS in Food on NPR

    John Meeker, Sc.D., talks about food as a source of exposure to perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) on Issues of the Environment, a weekly radio segment on Eastern Michigan’s National Public Radio (NPR) station. Meeker is deputy director of the Core Center at the University of Michigan (UM) and a project leader at the UM Children's Environmental Health Center.
  • Iowa Public Meeting Tackles Water Quality, Farming, Health

    Iowa Public Meeting Tackles Water Quality, Farming, Health

    A community forum, sponsored by the University of Iowa Core Center, included farm tours and a public meeting for NIEHS scientists, core center colleagues, and community members. At the forum, NIEHS and National Toxicology Program Director Linda Birnbaum, Ph.D., and others answered questions from the community about water quality, pesticides, cancer, and more.
  • UC Davis wildfire

    UC Davis Wildfire Research Featured on Local News

    On a local TV news segment, scientists with the University of California, Davis Core Center discuss their research to examine the health effects of the 2018 Camp Fire. The segment features Center Director, Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Ph.D., who studies the long-term health effects of wildfires, and center member Rebecca Schmidt, Ph.D., who studies how exposures from the wildfire may affect the health of pregnant women and their babies.

About Core Centers

About the EHS Core Centers Program

Scientist collaborating on a computer

The EHS Core Centers Program brings together researchers to tackle related environmental health questions.

Community Engagement Cores

People in a meeting

Community Engagement Cores translate and disseminate Center research results into information community members, decision makers, and public health professionals can use to protect and improve public health.

Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers Grantees

Map of Grantee Centers

There are more than 20 EHS Core Centers around the country, many of which have a long history of NIEHS support.

Center Spotlight

University of Rochester Researchers Discuss Vaping-Related Lung Injury on the Today Show

Picture of young woman vaping and blowing out smoke

University of Rochester Environmental Health Sciences Center members Daniel Croft, M.D., M.P.H., and Irfan Rahman, Ph.D., were featured on a Today Show segment about vaping-related lung injury. In the segment, Rahman is shown working in his lab while Croft discussed the symptoms associated with this condition.

Rahman uses cell, mouse, and human studies to investigate how flavoring chemicals used in vaping devices affect lung health. He also analyzes vaping liquid collected from patients and hospitals around the world to better understand its chemical makeup. Croft, a clinician researcher who focuses on inhalation toxicology, helps interpret the clinical relevance of findings from the lab and collaborates on a study to better understand respiratory effects in people who vape.

New Book Examines Collaboration to Address Environmental Health Issues

The book cover for
A new book, “Bridging Silos: Collaborating for Environmental Health and Justice in Urban Communities,” examines ways that community groups, government agencies, academic institutions, and private institutions can collaborate to address environmental health disparities. Written by Katrina Smith Korfmacher, Ph.D., of the University of Rochester Environmental Health Sciences Center, the book presents in-depth studies of three efforts to address long-standing environmental health issues: childhood lead poisoning in Rochester, New York; unhealthy built environments in Duluth, Minnesota; and pollution related to commercial ports and international trade in Southern California. The book is available for free download through MIT Press's Open Access initiative.

A Community-Engaged Pilot Study Leads to EPA Site Investigation

The Emory study team collects soil samples at a HWG garden site
Emory University’s HERCULES Exposome Research Center funded a community-engaged study to investigate urban soil contamination in Atlanta, Georgia. The study led to an U.S. Environmental Protection Agency site investigation. This outcome shows how engaging communities in studies may strengthen science and expand its impact.

Meeker Discusses PFAS in Food on NPR

Headshot of John Meeker, Sc.D.
John Meeker, Sc.D., talks about food as a source of exposure to perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) on Issues of the Environment, a weekly radio segment on Eastern Michigan’s National Public Radio (NPR) station. Meeker is deputy director of the Core Center at the University of Michigan (UM) and a project leader at the UM Children's Environmental Health Center.

Iowa Public Meeting Tackles Water Quality, Farming, Health

o	Iowa Public Meeting Tackles Water Quality, Farming, Health
A community forum, sponsored by the University of Iowa Core Center, included farm tours and a public meeting for NIEHS scientists, core center colleagues, and community members. At the forum, NIEHS and National Toxicology Program Director Linda Birnbaum, Ph.D., and others answered questions from the community about water quality, pesticides, cancer, and more.

UC Davis Wildfire Research Featured on Local News

UC Davis wildfire

On a local TV news segment, scientists with the University of California, Davis Core Center discuss their research to examine the health effects of the 2018 Camp Fire. The segment features Center Director, Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Ph.D., who studies the long-term health effects of wildfires, and center member Rebecca Schmidt, Ph.D., who studies how exposures from the wildfire may affect the health of pregnant women and their babies.

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