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Your Environment. Your Health.

Cosmetics and Your Health

Introduction

someone applying makeup to an African American woman

Millions of women and men around the world use cosmetics to enhance or change their appearance. The common term makeup refers to cosmetics such as foundation, eye shadow, eye liner, mascara, blush, and lipstick. Other cosmetics may include nail polish, body wash and moisturizers, perfumes, and hair coloring or styling products.

Hair dyes and straighteners involve a series of chemical reactions. For example, permanent hair color is mixed with colorless dye precursors and a stabilizer, and applied to the scalp and hair. The mix of chemicals process together to make the final color, which bonds to the hair.

The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act requires U.S. manufacturers to report the safety of their cosmetic products to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). But, cosmetics do not undergo the same stringent premarket approval as drugs, with the exception of color additives.1 Makeup products with sunscreen are treated as both cosmetics and drugs.

Cosmetics and personal care products contain a mix of chemicals. Researchers are working to better understand if any of these affect human health. Some chemicals are classified as endocrine disrupting, which means they may interfere with the body’s hormones and cause adverse health effects.2

Fact Sheets

Cosmetics and Hair Dye

What is NIEHS Doing?

  • Testing chemicals in cosmetics and personal care products – The National Toxicology Program (NTP), housed at NIEHS, conducts research on chemicals used in cosmetics and personal care products, such as the following. Antimicrobials, such as triclosan, used in some soaps and other products, to kill or stop the growth of microorganisms, such as bacteria.
    • Antimicrobials, such as triclosan, are used in some body washes and other products to kill or stop the growth of microorganisms, such as bacteria.
    • Engineered nanomaterials, like zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, are commonly used in cosmetics and sunscreens to protect skin from harmful ultraviolet rays. Engineered nanomaterials are measured in nanometers. A nanometer is one millionth of a millimeter, or approximately 100,000 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair.
    • Parabens are used to preserve the shelf life of many cosmetic and personal care products.
    • Phthalates are found in cosmetics, such as nail polish and hair spray, and plastic packaging.
  • The NIEHS Sister Study – Using data from the NIEHS Sister Study, NIEHS researchers found women who douched had an increased risk of ovarian cancer.3 The study also found that among white women, those classified as moderate and frequent users of beauty products had increased risk of breast cancer relative to infrequent users. Frequent users of skincare products also had increased risk of breast cancer relative to infrequent users, and among black women, the number of participants in subcategories of product use were too small to draw firm conclusions.4

    In an analysis of hair products usage, researchers found that frequent use of permanent hair dyes was associated with an increased risk of developing cancer, especially among black women. Frequent use of chemical hair straighteners was also associated with increased breast cancer risk regardless of race.5

    In a separate study, researchers used data on the use of genital powder and ovarian cancer from the Sister Study and three other prospective cohort studies. There was no statistically significant association between genital powder use and ovarian cancer, but they found a small increased risk of ovarian cancer for women with intact reproductive tracts (no hysterectomy or tubal ligation).6
  • Salon workers and pregnancy – NIEHS-funded research found women working as cosmetologists and manicurists had an increased risk for gestational diabetes, or diabetes that develops during pregnancy. They also found a higher risk for placenta previa, a condition where the placenta partially or totally covers the cervix — the opening to the uterus — which can cause severe bleeding during pregnancy and delivery.7
  • Adolescents and endocrine disruptors – NIEHS-supported research found that Latina adolescent girls, who reported daily use of personal care products, had higher levels of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in their urine, which may impact reproductive development.8

Collaboration with Other Federal Agencies

  • Tox21 – In collaboration with the National Center for Computational Toxicology at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences in the National Institutes of Health, and the FDA, NTP is conducting high-throughput toxicity testing of 10,000 chemical compounds, including those found in cosmetics.

Further Reading

Stories from the Environmental Factor (NIEHS Newsletter)

Press Releases

Podcasts

Additional Resources

Related Health Topics


  1. FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). 2016. Does FDA approve cosmetics before they go on the market? [accessed September 26, 2018]. [Available FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). 2016. Does FDA approve cosmetics before they go on the market? [accessed September 26, 2018].]
  2. Ferguson KK, Colacino JA, Lewis RC, Meeker JD. 2017. Personal care product use among adults in NHANES: associations between urinary phthalate metabolites and phenols and use of mouthwash and sunscreen. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol 27(3):326-332. [Abstract Ferguson KK, Colacino JA, Lewis RC, Meeker JD. 2017. Personal care product use among adults in NHANES: associations between urinary phthalate metabolites and phenols and use of mouthwash and sunscreen. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol 27(3):326-332.]
  3. Gonzalez NL, O’Brien KM, D’Aloisio AA, Sandler DP, Weinberg CR. 2016. Douching, talc use, and risk of ovarian cancer. Epidemiology 27(6):797-802. [Abstract Gonzalez NL, O’Brien KM, D’Aloisio AA, Sandler DP, Weinberg CR. 2016. Douching, talc use, and risk of ovarian cancer. Epidemiology 27(6):797-802.]
  4. Eberle C, Sandler DP, Taylor KW, White AJ. Hair dye and chemical straightener use and breast cancer risk in a large population of black and white women. In press, Int J Cancer 2019; DOI 10.1002/ijc.32738. E-pub 4 Dec 2019 [Abstract Eberle C, Sandler DP, Taylor KW, White AJ. Hair dye and chemical straightener use and breast cancer risk in a large population of black and white women. In press, Int J Cancer 2019; DOI 10.1002/ijc.32738. E-pub 4 Dec 2019]
  5. O’Brien KM, Tworoger SS, Harris HR, Anderson GL, Weinberg CR, Trabert B, Kaunitz AM, D’Aloisio AA, Sandler DP*, Wentzensen N* (*joint senior authors). Association of genital powder use with risk of ovarian cancer. J Amer Med Assoc 2020; 323: 49. E-pub 7 Jan 2020. [Abstract O’Brien KM, Tworoger SS, Harris HR, Anderson GL, Weinberg CR, Trabert B, Kaunitz AM, D’Aloisio AA, Sandler DP*, Wentzensen N* (*joint senior authors). Association of genital powder use with risk of ovarian cancer. J Amer Med Assoc 2020; 323: 49. E-pub 7 Jan 2020.]
  6. Quach T, Von Behren J, Goldberg D, Layefsky M, and Reynolds P. 2015. Adverse birth outcomes and maternal complications in licensed cosmetologists and manicurists in California. Int Arch Occup Environ Health 88(7):823-833. [Abstract Quach T, Von Behren J, Goldberg D, Layefsky M, and Reynolds P. 2015. Adverse birth outcomes and maternal complications in licensed cosmetologists and manicurists in California. Int Arch Occup Environ Health 88(7):823-833.]
  7. Berger KP, Kogut KR, Bradman A, She J, Gavin Q, Zahedi R, Parra KL, Harley KG. 2018. Personal care product use as a predictor of urinary concentrations of certain phthalates, parabens, and phenols in the HERMOSA study. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol; doi.org/10.1038/s41370-017-0003-z [online 09 January 2018]. [Abstract Berger KP, Kogut KR, Bradman A, She J, Gavin Q, Zahedi R, Parra KL, Harley KG. 2018. Personal care product use as a predictor of urinary concentrations of certain phthalates, parabens, and phenols in the HERMOSA study. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol; doi.org/10.1038/s41370-017-0003-z [online 09 January 2018].]
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