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Your Environment. Your Health.

Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS)

PFAS are a large group of compounds that have been used to make everyday products such as clothing and pans resistant to stains, grease, and water. They are also a component of aqueous film-forming foams, which have been used for fire suppression at airports, industrial facilities, and military sites.

PFAS are found globally and have been detected in soil, surface and groundwater, wildlife, and in humans. While researchers have established links between exposure to some PFAS and disease, many of these chemicals have not been studied and there is still much to learn about how PFAS may be affecting human health.

NIEHS is committed to studying the health outcomes and cleanup of PFAS, as well as communicating research findings to diverse audiences. NIEHS-funded research has revealed associations between PFAS exposures and a variety of adverse human health outcomes, including immune system dysfunction, impaired child development, and cancer. Additionally, NIEHS-funded researchers have developed promising technology that could help in the cleanup of areas where PFAS exposure is a problem.

close up of test tube with clear liquid being held by hand with blue gloves

Highlighted Research

NIEHS-funded researchers have established links between exposure to some PFAS and disease, but there is still much to learn about how PFAS may be affecting human health

map of US with states marked where NIEHS-Supported Researchers Focusing on PFAS is taking place

NIEHS-Supported Researchers Focusing on PFAS

NIEHS supports more than 40 research groups across the country to better understand the health effects of PFAS

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Published Studies Funded by Grants

NIEHS funds ground-breaking work on PFAS covering topics such as new technologies to clean-up PFAS and development impacts exposure to PFAS

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Related Resources

Resources from our federal partners and stories from the Environmental Factor newsletter

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Upcoming Events

NIEHS-supported researchers share their findings on PFAS at events across the country

Program Contacts

PFAS Health Effects Program Contact

Thaddeus Schug, Ph.D.
Thaddeus T. Schug, Ph.D.
Health Scientist Administrator
Tel 984-287-3319
schugt2@niehs.nih.gov
P.O. Box 12233
Mail Drop K3-15
Durham, N.C. 27709

PFAS Clean-up and Technologies Program Contact

Heather F. Henry, Ph.D.
Heather Henry, Ph.D.
Health Scientist Administrator, Superfund Research Program
Tel 984-287-3268
henryh@niehs.nih.gov
P.O. Box 12233
Mail Drop K3-04
Durham, N.C. 27709
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