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Your Environment. Your Health.

Public Health Impacts

Superfund Research Program

One of the primary goals of SRP-funded research is to improve public health. Thus, the Program supports a wide range of research to address the broad public health concerns arising from the release of hazardous substances into the environment. The intent is to provide sound science to those making public policy, regulatory, and risk reduction decisions. SRP-funded research has been successful in this area as studies have improved our understanding of the health effects associated with exposures to environmental contaminants. The following stories provide information on public health impacts. They are merely highlights and represent the breadth of work SRP researchers undertake. To see older stories, visit our archives webpage.

Innovative technology provides safe drinking water in California

People participating in a ribbon-cutting ceremony

A new technology, developed with NIEHS funding, will provide safe drinking water to California communities at approximately half the cost of other options and with virtually no secondary waste. NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) small business grantee Microvi Biotechnologies celebrated installation of its advanced nitrate removal technology during a grand opening Jan. 25 at Sunny Slope Water Company. The company delivers water to 30,000 households in southern California, and the new system will provide more than 200 million gallons of treated water to its customers.

FDA ban on antibacterials in soaps informed by SRP research

Soapy hands under water

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a rule banning 19 antibacterial chemicals as ingredients in over-the-counter (OTC) antibacterial hand and body washes. Development of the final rule was informed by research that included several studies from scientists supported by the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP). The final rule bans the sale of any OTC consumer soaps and body washes containing any of the banned chemicals, including triclosan and triclocarban, unless the product undergoes approval as a drug.

SRP Trainee Highlight: Joshua Preston, University of Kentucky

Joshua Preston

University of Kentucky (UK) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center trainee Joshua Preston is an undergraduate senior working under the guidance of Kevin Pearson, Ph.D. With the SRP team, Preston is exploring how exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) during and around pregnancy impacts offspring later in development. In particular, Preston explores how PCB exposure influences how genes are expressed in mice and how that may disrupt normal metabolic function and alter body composition. This information will be useful to understand the underlying mechanisms of how PCBs impact the body during development, which may open the door for targeted interventions to improve health.

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