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Your Environment. Your Health.

Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers

Scientific collaboration and cutting-edge technologies can advance environmental health sciences. The NIEHS Environmental Health Sciences (EHS) Core Centers Program facilitates these collaborations by funding institutional infrastructure to support scientific equipment, facilities, and other resources that can be shared among environmental health researchers. By pursuing shared research questions, the EHS Core Centers identify emerging issues that advance understanding about how pollutants and other environmental factors affect human biology and may lead to disease.

Currently, there are more than 20 centers across the country. Each center has its own strategic vision and scientific focus, but all share four common goals: advancing scientific research; promoting community engagement; advancing translational research; and training new researchers.

  • Nearly 50 community members met with staff from Columbia University and WE ACT for Environmental Justice

    Community Briefing Educates Women About Chemicals in Cosmetics and Personal Care Products

    Nearly 50 community members met with staff from Columbia University and WE ACT for Environmental Justice to learn about possible health risks from harmful chemicals found in cosmetics and personal care products.
  • semi truck parked in gas station parking lot at sunset

    Gas Stations Vent Far More Toxic Fumes Than Previously Thought

    A study led by Markus Hilpert, Ph.D., found that emissions from gas station vent pipes, which contain the carcinogenic chemical benzene, were ten times higher than estimates used in setback regulations that determine how close schools, playgrounds, and parks can be located to these facilities. The findings support the need to revisit regulations on setback distances for gas stations, which are based on 20-year-old estimates of emissions. Hilpert is a member of the Center for Environmental Health in Northern Manhattan at Columbia University.
  • Scott Langevin

    CEG Member Langevin Awarded New Grant from the American Cancer Society

    The American Cancer Society awarded Scott Langevin, Ph.D., a $782,000 grant for his research using a mouth rinse test to detect mouth and throat cancers in their earliest stages. He credits his early career support from the University of Cincinnati Center for Environmental Genetics (CEG) for helping him get the grant.
  • Daniel Croft accepts the ATS David Bates Award with mentors, Mark Utell and Mark Frampton

    Croft Receives ATS Award for Air Pollution Research

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS) Assembly on Environmental, Occupational and Population Health, awarded Daniel Croft, M.D., the David Bates Award for the best submitted abstract in the field of environmental or occupational health at the ATS 2018 International Conference. Croft is a member of the University of Rochester Medical Center Environmental Health Sciences Center.
  • Jeremy Sarnat and Donghai Liang

    Metabolomics for Identifying New Traffic Pollutant Exposure Markers

    Researchers from Emory University are investigating what traffic-related air pollutants people are exposed to and the health effects that might occur as a result.
  • woman holding video camera

    Waking Up to Wildfires Film Makes World Premiere

    On November 4, 2018, more than 250 people packed a theater in Sonoma, California for the world premiere of “Waking Up to Wildfires.” The documentary was funded in part by NIEHS through a grant to the University of California Davis Environmental Health Sciences Core Center.

About Core Centers

About the EHS Core Centers Program

Scientist collaborating on a computer

The EHS Core Centers Program brings together researchers to tackle related environmental health questions.

Community Engagement Cores

People in a meeting

Community Engagement Cores translate and disseminate Center research results into information community members, decision makers, and public health professionals can use to protect and improve public health.

Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers Grantees

Map of Grantee Centers

There are more than 20 EHS Core Centers around the country, many of which have a long history of NIEHS support.

Center Spotlight

Community Briefing Educates Women About Chemicals in Cosmetics and Personal Care Products

Community Briefing Educates Women About Chemicals in Cosmetics and Personal Care Products
Nearly 50 community members met with staff from Columbia University and WE ACT for Environmental Justice to learn about possible health risks from harmful chemicals found in cosmetics and personal care products.

CEG Member Langevin Awarded New Grant from the American Cancer Society

Scott Langevin
The American Cancer Society awarded Scott Langevin, Ph.D., a $782,000 grant for his research using a mouth rinse test to detect mouth and throat cancers in their earliest stages. He credits his early career support from the University of Cincinnati (UC) Center for Environmental Genetics (CEG) for helping him get the grant.

Croft Receives ATS Award for Air Pollution Research

Croft accepts the ATS David Bates Award with mentors, Mark Utell Utell and Mark Frampton
The American Thoracic Society (ATS) awarded Daniel Croft, M.D., the David Bates Award for the best submitted abstract in the field of environmental or occupational health at the ATS 2018 International Conference. Croft is a member of the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) Environmental Health Sciences Center.

Metabolomics for Identifying New Traffic Pollutant Exposure Markers

Jeremy Sarnat, Sc.D.
Researchers from Emory University are investigating what traffic-related air pollutants people are exposed to and the health effects that might occur as a result.

Waking Up to Wildfires Film Makes World Premiere

woman holding video camera
On November 4, 2018, more than 250 people packed a theater in Sonoma, California for the world premiere of “Waking Up to Wildfires.” The documentary was funded in part by NIEHS through a grant to the University of California Davis Environmental Health Sciences Core Center.
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