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Your Environment. Your Health.

Medical College of Wisconsin

Gigiigooinaan (Our Fish): A New Advisory to Promote Anishinaabe Health and Wellness

NIEHS Grant: R01ES028255

Matthew J. Dellinger, Ph.D.

The health of tribal cultures such as the Anishinaabe (Laurentian Great Lakes Ojibwe/Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatomi) are intimately tied to the consumption of fish. Unfortunately, their food source may be contaminated with harmful persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). PBTs are a group of chemicals that stay in the environment for long periods of time and accumulate in the food chain, posing risks to human health. Researchers from the Medical College of Wisconsin along with tribal officials have piloted a fish consumption advisory app called, “Gigiigooinaan” (Our Fish). The goal of this culturally tailored, interactive, and personalized platform is to promote healthy fish consumption choices among the Anishinaabe population in the region. If successful, Gigiigooinaan will enable users to maximize the nutritional benefits of eating fish while reducing health risks associated with chemical contaminants. More importantly, this will enable the Anishinaabe population to maintain important tribal ways that include the harvest and consumption of fish.


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