Skip Navigation
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Internet Explorer is no longer a supported browser.

This website may not display properly with Internet Explorer. For the best experience, please use a more recent browser such as the latest versions of Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and/or Mozilla Firefox. Thank you.

Your Environment. Your Health.

E-Waste and Environmental Health

Partnerships for Environmental Public Health (PEPH)

November 9, 2018

E-Waste and Environmental Health

In this webinar, we heard presentations about NIEHS-funded work at two e-waste sites, one in Guiyu, China and another in Accra, Ghana. Aimin Chen, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Cincinnati investigated the developmental effects of e-waste toxicant mixtures and provided human study evidence to inform regulatory actions and public health prevention in Guiyu. Stephani Kim, Ph.D., who is now a fellow at NIEHS, collaborated with Dr. Chen and spoke from the perspective of working with the community. Julius Fobil, Ph.D., of the University of Ghana studies the risks at the Agbogbloshie e-waste site in Accra to inform evidence-based implementation and policy options. He discussed his work on building trust at the site and getting buy-in from tribal chiefs before and during the study.

Presentations

Experts

Aimin Chen, M.D., Ph.D.

Aimin Chen, M.D., Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Environmental Health at the University of Cincinnati. His primary research interest is perinatal and pediatric environmental epidemiology, studying chemical exposures and adverse pregnancy outcomes, child neurodevelopment, obesity and metabolic disorders. He has conducted epidemiologic research on DDT, isoflavones, lead, mercury, cadmium, tobacco smoke, flame retardants, perfluoroalkyl substances, particulate matter, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. With NIEHS funding, he investigated the developmental effects of e-waste toxicant mixtures and provided human study evidence to inform regulatory actions and public health prevention in Guiyu, China.

Stephani Kim, Ph.D.

Stephani Kim, Ph.D., received her doctoral degree in epidemiology from the Department of Environmental Health at the University of Cincinnati. Her dissertation focused on exposures and adverse birth outcomes related to informal e-waste recycling, and she recently published an article on the topic in the Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology. She currently is serving as a postdoctoral fellow in the Perinatal and Early Life Group of the NIEHS’s Epidemiology Branch.

Julius Fobil, Dr.P.H.

Julius Fobil, Dr.P.H., is an associate professor and head of the Department of Biological, Environmental, and Occupational Health Sciences at the University of Ghana. He is also a project co-leader of the West Africa - Michigan Collaborative Health Alliance for Reshaping Training, Education, and Research in Global Environmental and Occupational Health. His research focuses on urban environmental health in low-income economies with an emphasis on the impact of sanitation infrastructure, neighborhood environmental conditions, environmental change, and area-based socioeconomic inequalities on urban mortalities.

For More Information

GEOHealth West Africa 
The West Africa - Michigan Charter II for GEOHealth builds upon long-standing, extensive occupational and environmental health research and training collaborations between academic and government institutions in Ghana, as well as other countries of West Africa, the University of Michigan, and McGill University. On this website, learn more about research related to the Agbogbloshie e-waste site in Accra, Ghana.

We want your feedback!

Send comments, questions, and suggestions for future webinar topics to peph@niehs.nih.gov.

Back
to Top