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Your Environment. Your Health.

Wildfire Smoke and Children’s Health

Partnerships for Environmental Public Education (PEPH)

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wildfire and smoke

Wildfire Smoke and Children’s Health

July 30, 2021

Interviewee: Stephanie Holm, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H

In this podcast, Stephanie Holm, M.D., Ph.D., discusses children’s health risks from wildfire smoke exposure. She also offers advice to parents on how to keep kids safe during a wildfire event.

Wildfire Smoke and Children’s Health

Wildfire smoke can travel long distances, exposing people near and far to poor air quality. Children are especially vulnerable to health effects from wildfire smoke. This is because they breathe more air relative to their size, spend more time outdoors, and are more active than adults. In addition, they are still growing and developing.

In this podcast, Stephanie Holm, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., discusses children’s health risks from wildfire smoke exposure. She also offers advice to pediatricians and parents on how to keep kids safe during a wildfire event.

Interviewee: Stephanie Holm, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H.

Stephanie Holm, M.D., Ph.D.

Stephanie Holm, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H, is an environmental pediatrician and epidemiologist. She is the co-director of the Western States Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (PEHSU) and works part time at the California Environmental Protection Agency in the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. Holm’s research focuses on air pollution and children’s health. She is especially interested in the health effects of wildfire smoke in children and public health strategies to protect children during these disasters.

Additional Resources

  • Read Trinka and Sam: The Big Fire, a children’s story from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. The story helps young children and their families talk about feelings and worries they may have after experiencing a wildfire. The story is available in English and Spanish..
  • Check out the Help Kids Cope app from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network which helps parents talk to their kids about the disasters and know how best to support them.
  • Listen to a 2020 PEPH podcast about urban wildfires and how these disasters affect individual and community health.
  • Visit the Western States PEHSU Wildfires and Children’s Health to learn more about how to protect your family from wildfire smoke.
  • Check out the Smoke Sense app to get involved in a citizen science research project focused on increasing public awareness and engagement related to wildfire smoke health risks. The Smoke Sense Study is being conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Relevant References

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