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Your Environment. Your Health.

2019 News

Superfund Research Program

May 03, 2019 New

NC Fish Forum Brings Partners Together to Improve Fish Consumption Advisories

Breakout Group

Breakout groups discussed suggestions to improve the fish consumption advisory process.
(Photo courtesy of the Duke SRP Center)

On March 21, the Duke University Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center convened stakeholders from across North Carolina in Raleigh to discuss fish consumption advisories and how to improve the process to best protect public health. NC Fish Forum attendees focused on known risks like mercury, as well as emerging contaminants such as per- and polyfluorinated compounds.

Participants included members of state and local environmental, public health, and wildlife management agencies, as well as sport fishermen and riverkeepers. At the start of the half-day meeting, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services officials walked through the current fish consumption advisory process. Next, the attendees shared thoughts about how the process might be improved. Suggestions included simpler messaging and more engagement with subsistence fish consumers.

Participants discussed ways to improve communication between government agencies and the public and how to create more effective fish consumption advisory signs. Following the full group discussion, attendees divided into breakout groups to delve into the identified challenges. Attendees were asked to focus on what an ideal fish consumption advisory process might look like and concrete actions that could help bring them closer to that ideal. At the end of the day, attendees reflected on goals and future challenges and discussed how to turn these conversations into meaningful action.

NC Fish Forum Whiteboard
Mike Schlegel, visual notetaker and founder of the Whiteboard Academy, helped facilitate the forum and worked throughout the day to capture a visual summary of the key points and discussions, shown here. Schlegel also has a background in watershed science, so he offered a uniquely informed perspective on the issue. (Image courtesy of the Duke SRP Center)

End of Story

May 02, 2019 New

Jerry Schnoor Receives 2019 ACS Award for Innovative Plant-Based Cleanup Advances

Jerry Schnoor, Ph.D.

Schnoor is the Allen S. Henry Chair in Engineering and a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Iowa.
(Photo courtesy of the University of Iowa)

Jerry Schnoor, Ph.D., a University of Iowa Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center project leader, received the American Chemical Society (ACS) Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology during the ACS Spring 2019 National Meeting, held March 31 - April 4 in Orlando, Florida.

Schnoor has pioneered the science and practice of phytoremediation, which uses plants and microbes to reduce toxicants in the environment. It is a natural, green, and cost-effective way to clean up hazardous waste sites, contaminated soil and groundwater, and agricultural runoff.

During the award ceremony, Joel Burken, Ph.D., a former SRP grantee, described Schnoor as a "thought leader and scientist," and indicated that "few if any other individuals or labs have covered this breadth of the science and engineering in the field."

Currently, Schnoor leads an Iowa SRP Center project using phytoremediation to degrade polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from soil and groundwater. PCBs are classified as human carcinogens and have been banned from the United States since 1979. However, they are still found in water, soil, sediment, and animal and plant tissue.

Because phytoremediation puts plants in direct contact with these toxicants, understanding the fate of these chemicals and how plants help in the degradation process is important. According to Burken, Schnoor has laid a solid foundation for understanding what happens to pollutants after they are taken up by plants.

In his award address, Schnoor spoke about how plant science has changed the field of environmental chemistry, contributing to the cleanup of contaminated sites. He also explained how the microbes within plants are beneficial in removing pollutants.

ACS Award Special Symposium

In addition to receiving the award, Schnoor was honored through a special symposium, where those inspired by his work were invited to give lectures. Iowa SRP Center Director Keri Hornbuckle, Ph.D., and Iowa SRP Center researchers Tim Mattes, Ph.D., and Benoit Van Aiken, Ph.D., were among those who discussed their research. Each scientist explores how PCBs impact a specific part of the global ecosystem.

Hornbuckle discussed her work to identify sources of PCBs in indoor air, including PCB emissions from paint, chalk, and paper. Her research has shown that the inhalation of indoor airborne PCBs might be just as important as exposure to PCBs through diet.

Van Aiken described his recent study in which he identified plant genes that stimulated the breakdown and detoxification of certain PCBs.

Lastly, Mattes described his research on PCBs in aquatic sediments and the roles of microorganisms and genes in PCB sediment cleanup, which may lead to improvements in PCB sediment removal strategies.

ACS attendees
American Chemical Society special symposium attendees and presenters
(Photo courtesy of the Iowa SRP Center)

April 24, 2019

Translating Research to Assessments and Planning for a Changing Climate

Jennifer Horney

Jennifer Horney, Ph.D.
(Photo courtesy of the University of Delaware)

Two Texas A&M University (TAMU) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center projects are translating their research to help communities facing impacts and health risks from climate-related disasters, such as wildfires and flooding. These projects are improving community assessments and resilience planning in areas facing these challenges.

For example, their earlier work helped inform a recent guide for local municipalities called Climate Change, Health, and Equity: A Guide for Local Health Departments, produced by the Public Health Institute Center for Climate Change and Health. The guide cites a project led by Katie Kirsch and Jennifer Horney, Ph.D., of the University of Delaware. Kirsch and Horney are now members of the TAMU community engagement core (CEC), with Horney serving as the CEC leader.

The guide suggests actions that municipalities can take when wildfires occur, citing the team's findings from a Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) survey following a large wildfire in Bastrop, Texas in 2011. Their work showed how the CASPER survey quickly provides household-level information about community needs after a disaster at a relatively low cost and informs decision making for preparedness, planning, and recovery.

Katie Hirsch

Katie Hirsch
(Photo courtesy of TAMU)

Horney also worked with another TAMU SRP researcher, Galen Newman, Ph.D., to help develop a Resilience Scorecard for the Department of Homeland Security's Coastal Resilience Center. Newman is an associate professor in the TAMU Department of Landscape Architecture & Urban Planning and a member of the TAMU CEC. They applied the scorecard in the Geodesign process to assess flood vulnerability and develop a resilient master plan for League City, Texas. Geodesign is an approach to community development planning that integrates several fields of science in strategies that anticipate climate-related impacts like rising sea levels. The scorecard uses projections for the 100-year floodplain based on the anticipated sea-level rise by 2100.

The TAMU SRP Center is developing and applying tools to address hazardous exposures during environmental emergencies to help communities measure impacts and prevent problems in the future. Specifically, it is focused on understanding how flooding during natural disasters might redistribute hazardous substances. These projects illustrate how the TAMU CEC is translating its research to help towns, cities, and community members better protect their health.

April 19, 2019

Brown SRP Database Helps Identify Areas of Toxic Waste Contamination

Heat map showing risk of PFAS contamination in Rhode Island
The Brown University SRP Center team used its tool to help the Rhode Island Department of Health identify hot spots with high risk of PFAS contamination, shown in red. (Image courtesy of the Brown University SRP Center)

Researchers from the Brown University Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center designed a geospatial tool and database to map and identify areas in Rhode Island that are likely to be contaminated with toxic waste.

Modeled off research by Community Engagement Core Leader Scott Frickel, Ph.D., tracking industrial hazards in four cities, the team looked at historical data to identify areas of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) and other hazardous waste contamination in Providence, Rhode Island. PFAS can result from the use of aqueous film forming foams at airports, military installations, and firefighting training sites and also have been used in consumer products. PFAS, which are very stable and do not readily break down in the environment, have been found in several drinking water systems and have been linked to potential reproductive, developmental, liver, kidney, and immunological health effects.

Frickel was joined by Brown SRP trainee Tom Marlow, who worked with collaborators to create the algorithm, and former Engineering State Agencies Liaison Jennifer Guelfo, Ph.D., who led the sampling effort and worked with Marlow to develop a risk index. A risk index refers to the criteria for labeling different areas as high or low risk for contamination. The algorithm extracts data from historical directories to map toxic waste sites.

This new tool helped the team understand how the geography of hazardous waste changes over time, where contaminants remain, and how populations have changed, leading some groups to be more highly exposed than others. Working with the Brown SRP team, the Rhode Island Department of Health used this analysis to select sites to sample and test for PFAS contamination.

Moving forward, the team plans to replicate its study in Ohio and to use its findings to inform decision making related to ecology, hydrology, and transportation.

April 17, 2019

Socioeconomic Status Contributes to Arsenic-related Diabetes Risk

A new Superfund Research Program (SRP) study showed that arsenic-exposed Chileans with lower socioeconomic status (SES) were more likely to develop diabetes than those with higher SES. According to the authors, these results suggest that low SES individuals may be more vulnerable to some of the harmful effects of arsenic exposure, such as type 2 diabetes.

Stephanie Eick

Eick is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Georgia, working with Jose Cordero, M.D., as part of the Northeastern University SRP Center.
(Photo courtesy of Stephanie Eick)

The study, led by SRP trainee Stephanie Eick, a 2018 SRP KC Donnelly Externship Award winner, stems from her externship work with Craig Steinmaus, Ph.D., at the University of California (UC), Berkeley SRP Center.

During her externship, she used data collected from a cancer study in Northern Chile to evaluate links between arsenic, diabetes, and socioeconomic status. The study population gets their drinking water from municipal sources that have been monitored for arsenic for many decades, with wide ranges in concentrations during that time. Because of the comprehensive records of past arsenic water concentrations, the researchers can estimate lifetime arsenic exposure.

Both arsenic and low SES have previously been linked to type 2 diabetes, so Eick set out to evaluate whether arsenic-related diabetes risks differ between people with low and high SES. She used data from a self-reporting survey to estimate SES, which collected information such as ownership of household appliances and cars. The researchers also collected information about participants' sex, diet, weight, and other health conditions.

Eick determined that within the group with below average SES, people with the highest arsenic exposure had 2.2 times greater risk of type 2 diabetes than people with the lowest arsenic exposure. Within the above average SES group, arsenic exposure did not substantially change their risk of type 2 diabetes. According to the authors, these findings contribute to the growing body of literature suggesting that low SES is an important risk factor for environmentally-induced diseases.

April 12, 2019

SRP-Funded Small Business Gears Up to Hit the Shelves

CycloPure, Inc., a small business funded by the Superfund Research Program (SRP), has announced a major advance in their cost-effective water filtration technology called DEXSORB. Their new product, DEXSORB+, works to rapidly remove per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from contaminated water supplies. PFAS, which have been used in consumer products and aqueous film-forming foams at airports, military installations, and firefighting training sites, do not break down and can accumulate in the environment.

CycloPure, Inc.

CycloPure’s technology involves cup-shaped structures of cyclodextrin that allow binding and removal of a variety of pollutants.
(Photo courtesy of CycloPure, Inc.)

CycloPure recently announced that in addition to SRP funding, they had raised an additional $3.5 million to accelerate the commercialization of their DEXSORB products. This will allow them to make the technology available to consumers and municipal drinking water plants impacted by PFAS and other contaminants.

The company's line of DEXSORB adsorbents are based on innovative technology that converts renewable cyclodextrins, derived from corn starch, into highly-adsorbent materials capable of eliminating a variety of pollutants from drinking water. In their new DEXSORB+ product, they created a new process that enhances the binding ability of DEXSORB and found that it resulted in a seven-fold improvement in the removal of 20 short and long chain PFAS compounds, including GenX. For example, according to the company, DEXORB+ can remove more than 95% of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) even at low concentrations in only 30 minutes.

According to CycloPure Chief Executive Officer Frank Cassou, they are working to make eco-friendly DEXSORB available for home use, in portable water bottles, and for municipal drinking water treatment. They aim to launch their first DEXSORB+ product later this year.

April 10, 2019

SRP Research Shines at SOT

Superfund Research Program (SRP) grantees from all over the country gathered in Baltimore, Maryland, for the 2019 Society of Toxicology (SOT) Annual Meeting on March 10 – 14. Grantees and staff gave talks and presented posters highlighting SRP-funded research advances in toxicology.

More than 70 SRP project leaders and trainees from at least 15 SRP Centers presented oral and poster presentations. NIEHS SRP staff members Danielle Carlin, Ph.D., Michelle Heacock, Ph.D., Heather Henry, Ph.D., Brittany Trottier and interim SRP Director David Balshaw, Ph.D., were on hand to meet with grantees, view their posters, and discuss their innovative research. An SRP reception also gave trainees the opportunity to network.

Recognizing SRP Successes

Heather Henry with BU grantees

Henry, right, stops to take a photo with Boston SRP Center project leader Jennifer Schlezinger, Ph.D., left, and Boston SRP Center trainee and Wetterhahn Award winner Stephanie Kim, center.
(Photo courtesy of Heather Henry)

At SOT, several SRP-funded researchers were recognized with awards for exceptional publications, presentations, and submitted abstracts.

For example, Texas A&M SRP Center director Ivan Rusyn, Ph.D., was honored during the SOT awards ceremony as the senior author of the Toxicological Sciences Paper of the Year. The paper, funded in part by SRP, shows how using Collaborative Cross (CC), a large panel of genetically diverse strains of mice, is a valuable tool to evaluate variation between individuals in how chemicals are metabolized and to identify genes and pathways that may underpin population differences.

Among the many awards to SRP researchers from specialty sections, Michigan State University SRP Center trainee Lance Blevins, Ph.D., was awarded the Best Postdoctoral Presentation from the SOT Immunotoxicology Specialty Section. Blevin's research provides insight into mechanisms associated with activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in human immune B cells, a biological pathway known to be disrupted by many environmental contaminants.

University of New Mexico SRP Center researcher Debra MacKenzie, Ph.D., was recognized as one of the top five abstracts in the SOT Mixtures Specialty Section for her research identifying correlations between metal exposure and changes to the immune system within the Navajo Birth Cohort Study. Texas A&M SRP Center trainee Zunwei Chen was also awarded one of the top five best abstracts in the SOT Mixtures Specialty Section for his work developing a multi-tissue human cell model to rapidly identify hazardous environmental chemicals and mixtures.

Presenting Innovative Findings

Society of Toxicology e-waste presenters

Presenters and participants in the e-waste session included, from left, Trottier; Paromita Chakraborty, Ph.D., of SRM University, Chennai, India; Bob Sonawane, Ph.D., Toxicology and Risk Assessment Consulting Services (TRACS) LLC; NIEHS Director Linda Birnbaum, Ph.D.; Bruce Fowler, Ph.D., TRACS LLC; and Heacock.
(Photo courtesy of Heather Henry)

University of Kentucky SRP Center postdoctoral fellow Michael Petriello, Ph.D., gave a platform presentation on the effect of lifestyle changes on the relationship between circulating levels of per- and poly-fluorinated chemicals and serum cholesterol as part of the session highlighting emerging scientists.

University of New Mexico SRP Center researcher Matt Campen chaired a symposium on cardiovascular toxicology and presented diverse approaches to investigate the impacts of toxicants on the cells that line the interior surface of blood vessels and systemic inflammation.

Society of Toxicology PFAS session

In another session on per- and polyfluoroakyl substances (PFAS), University of Rhode Island (URI) SRP Center researcher Angela Slitt, Ph.D., third from left, presented her work to understand the influence of diet and PFAS exposure on liver outcomes. The session was chaired by National Toxicology Program toxicologist Sue Fenton, Ph.D. Participants in the session included, from left, URI SRP Center trainees Marissa Pfohl and Emily Marques; Slitt; Fenton; Bevin Blake, a graduate student with Fenton; and Heacock.
(Photo courtesy of Michelle Heacock)

In a session chaired by Heacock, presenters highlighted the public health and risk assessment challenges associated with electronic waste, or e-waste, an emerging area in the field of toxicology. As part of the session, Trottier presented the challenges of studying e-waste in different geographical areas and reducing exposure to the hazardous substances associated with recycling. "The increasing number of e-waste sites makes it challenging to protect humans and the environment," she said. The hazardous substances recyclers are exposed to cause health effects, such as damage to the central nervous system and kidneys, according to Trottier.

Carlin presented during the workshop session titled "Applying Systems Biology Approaches to Understand the Joint Action of Chemical and Nonchemical Stressors." She discussed using atherosclerosis as a model disease to determine the interaction of chemical and non-chemical stressors.

SRP staff were also available in the NIEHS Research Funding Insights Room, where current grantees and applicants could speak with program officers or scientific review officers about the grants process. For more information about NIEHS at SOT, see the Environmental Factor article.

March 29, 2019

Economic Benefits of Green Infrastructure for Vacant Lands

Master plan for the Sunnyside community
The master plan for the Sunnyside community shows parks, gardens, and ponds to help manage stormwater and utilize 100% of vacant land space (© Ren Dingding).

A recent study at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center suggests that installing green infrastructure features, such as water-absorbing rain gardens, on vacant lands can provide ecological and economic benefits, particularly in communities with frequent flooding.

Many urban areas have vacant lots, and areas with a history of flooding are especially prone to challenges when considering redevelopment of the properties. The Texas coast is one of the most heavily impacted areas from coastal storms in the world. TAMU SRP researcher Galen Newman, Ph.D., set out to evaluate the economic and hydrologic performance of green infrastructure development projects in three neighborhoods in Houston, Texas, with high risks of flooding. The plans are based on a design approach they call "Resilience through Regeneration" that focuses on reducing effects of flooding in communities through vacant lot reuse.

Galen Newman

Galen Newman
(Photo courtesy of TAMU SRP)

The TAMU SRP Center, established in 2017, focuses on exposures to chemical mixtures during environmental emergencies and developing tools to understand and prevent the health consequences of those exposures. Newman is an associate professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning, and co-principal investigator of the Community Engagement Core at TAMU SRP.

Green infrastructure involves building rain gardens, rain water detention areas, green roofs, and other features that can act as sponges to absorb and retain large volumes of water during flooding events. Planners refer to this approach as using "Sponge City principles." For this study, TAMU researchers analyzed land use plans using Sponge City principles they developed for each of the three neighborhoods to predict water flow and retention, as well as economic costs and benefits, if the plans were implemented.

Their analysis showed that the designs would capture 7 – 40 million gallons of stormwater per year across the three communities, representing an increased capacity of 22.2 million gallons annually. Other benefits include more tree coverage, walkable space, and green space, including improvements to nearly all of the vacant lands.

The researchers also analyzed construction and maintenance costs and economic benefits of implementing the plans in the three communities. For the three sites analyzed, construction costs ranged from $8 million to $30 million. Sunnyside had the highest total annual green benefits of $5 million, and the site would take 20 years to produce a return on investment. On average, the sites would take about 40 years to produce a return on investment.

The researchers concluded that applying Sponge City principles to urban planning for vacant lands could provide ecological and economic benefits to local communities. Their report includes details that other urban planners could apply in their work.

March 21, 2019

Component of Flaxseed Helps Protect Heart Function in Septic Mice

Flaxseeds
Flaxseeds contain antioxidants and other important compounds.

A novel synthetic compound made from flaxseed can protect heart function in mice with sepsis, according to new research in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center. Sepsis is an inflammatory condition that develops in response to infection and can lead to heart failure and death.

Penn SRP Center researcher Melpo Christofidou-Solomidou, Ph.D., leads a Center project focused on developing a novel synthetic flaxseed compound, called LGM2605, as a preventive treatment for diseases associated with asbestos exposure. Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral that was widely used in commercial products for insulation, sound absorption, and flame resistance until the 1990s. Exposure to asbestos is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in the lung, which can lead to a rare form of lung cancer called mesothelioma.

Christofidou-Solomidou has found that LGM2605 may be a promising approach to prevent the inflammation and oxidative stress that leads to lung disease following asbestos exposure in mice. The new study shows how LGM2605 also can help reverse other inflammatory diseases, like sepsis, in mice.

In the current study, researchers found that when mice with sepsis were given LGM2605, their heart function improved. The authors found that LGM2605 reduced oxidative stress in the heart and increased the abundance and function of mitochondria, which are responsible for producing energy in cells. According to the authors, restoring energy production in the heart is critical for repairing heart function and improving survival from sepsis.

March 19, 2019

How High-Fat Diets Drive Colorectal Cancer Growth

Dividing Cells

Colon cancer growth, as measured by the number of dividing cells shown in green, is dramatically increased when the FXR-regulated gene network is disrupted by specific bile acids or a high-fat diet.
(Photo courtesy of the Salk Institute)

New research identifies a pathway that explains how high-fat diets can lead to colorectal cancer, a cancer that starts in the colon or rectum. The new findings may help explain why colorectal cancer rates are increasing in adults under 50 years old and open new possibilities for treating cancer.

As you eat, the intestine and colon, commonly referred to as the gut, need to constantly renew its lining to undo routine damage done by digestive acids. To do this, the gut contains stem cells that can replace lining cells when needed. Ron Evans, Ph.D., and postdoctoral fellow Ting Fu, Ph.D., recently discovered that high-fat diets change the digestive acid balance in the intestines, and that triggers a hormone signal leading to rapid growth of stem cells in the gut that could lead to cancer. Evans' lab at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies is part of the University of California, San Diego Superfund Research Program. Their results were recently published in the journal Cell and described in a video.

Evans' team has been studying mice that have a variant of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, a tumor suppressor gene that is active in the gut. The variant form does not suppress tumors as well as other APC forms, and mice with this variant APC gene get colorectal cancer faster when fed a high-fat diet. Using this model, the team is investigating the role of digestive, or bile, acids and a hormone-signaling protein call Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in colorectal cancer.

They found that when APC-variant mice were fed high-fat diets, two types of bile acids increased as cancer started to develop. Adding more bile acids sped up cancer growth. The researchers discovered that these bile acids reduced FXR's ability to slow growth, resulting in more cell growth leading to cancer. To test this further, the researchers added the bile acids to intestinal stem cells in lab cultures and found greatly increased cell divisions and DNA damage. In addition, stimulating FXR activity resulted in less cell and tumor growth.

Based on these results, the researchers suggest that stimulating FXR may be an effective approach for cancer-treating drugs. "This study provides a new way to lower inflammation, restore intestinal health, and dramatically reduce tumor progression," says Evans.

March 18, 2019

SRP Grantees Develop a Better Way to Measure Cell Survival

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center recently developed a new test that rapidly measures the effect of different chemicals on cell survival. Measuring cell survival is critical for screening potentially toxic chemicals and protecting human health. The technology was developed as part of an NIEHS small business grant, with partial funding from the MIT SRP Center.

Led by Bevin Engelward, Ph.D., the team developed a test that can generate results in just a few days, rather than two or three weeks, while still matching the accuracy and sensitivity of traditional approaches. It also relies on automated rather than manual analyses to measure subtle changes in cell survival. Their method, called MicroColonyChip, was recently published in Cell Reports.

With the new method, they were able to accurately replicate results of previous studies using traditional approaches. According to the authors, the new technique can improve how new medical drugs are tested and can help environmental regulatory agencies responsible for testing chemicals work more efficiently.

The authors added that in the future, the MicroColonyChip may be useful in personalized medicine, where it could be used to test the effect of multiple drugs on a patient’s cells before beginning treatment. The researchers have filed for a patent on their new technology.

Images of cell growth
Images of cell growth on the MicroColonyChip over time, including 40X magnification. From Cell Reports 2019 26(6):1668-1678.e4. DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2019.01.053

February 20, 2019

STEEP Highlighted in Nature News Feature

Gardiner collects water samples

The story featured a photograph of Gardiner collecting water from passive samplers in Narragansett Bay.
(Photo courtesy of XiaoZhi Lim)

University of Rhode Island Superfund Research Program (SRP) Sources, Transport, Exposure, and Effects of PFASs (STEEP) Center researchers were featured in a story in Nature about their efforts to measure poly- and perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) in water, and to understand their movement in the environment and impacts on human health.

PFAS have been used in consumer products like non-stick cooking pans. They also can result from the use of aqueous film forming foams at airports, military installations, and firefighting training sites. Because the carbon-fluorine bond is very strong, PFAS are stable and do not break down quickly in the environment.

The news story described research by STEEP Center project leader Philippe Grandjean, M.D., D.M.Sc., linking higher PFAS exposure in children to altered immune response. His work to measure the concentrations of PFAS in blood samples from mothers and their children in the Faroe Islands began more than 20 years ago and is continuing as part of his SRP project.

Christine Gardiner, a trainee under the guidance of STEEP Center Director Rainer Lohmann, Ph.D., was featured for her work to collect water samples in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Gardiner began this effort after fire-fighting foams were used to prevent combustion when a tanker truck spilled nearly 13,000 gallons of fuel near the Providence River. She plans to use the data to understand how PFAS traveled through the area after it was applied.

The story also described a STEEP Center project led by Elsie Sunderland, Ph.D., to track 30 different PFAS from their sources to where they end up on the environment. Sunderland's project aims to better understand the PFAS concentrations in fish and drinking water from contaminated sites, which will improve exposure characterization for impacted populations.

February 20, 2019

In Sites Unseen, Frickel Examines Legacies of Industrial Past

Sites Unseen

In a new book, Scott Frickel, Ph.D., a professor of sociology and member of the Brown University Superfund Research Program (Brown SRP) Center, discusses the industrial past of four different cities, and how their history helps us to better understand and manage potentially toxic contamination.

In the book, Sites Unseen, Frickel and co-author James Elliott set out to discover former industrial sites in New Orleans, Minneapolis, Philadelphia, and Portland, Oregon. The findings are a direct extension of work Frickel has done to map historical manufacturing sites as part of the Brown SRP Center Community Engagement Core.

Using original data assembled and mapped for thousands of former manufacturers' locations dating back to the 1950s, they found that more than 90 percent of such sites have now been converted to urban amenities such as parks, homes, and store fronts with almost no environmental review. And because manufacturers tend to open plants on new, non-industrial lots rather than on lots previously occupied by other manufacturers, associated hazards continue to spread. According to the authors, their findings suggest that these and many other American cities now face a legacy hazardous waste problem they don’t even know they have.

The book suggests that, over time, risks accumulate over broader areas – including white working-class neighborhoods, lower-income and minority neighborhoods that came before them, and gentrifying areas such as Philadelphia's Northern Liberties. The authors add that the sooner this problem is recognized, the sooner Americans can reclaim their cities and inform environmental regulations that will ensure our collective well-being.

February 14, 2019

Assessing PAH Exposure with the Swinomish Tribe

OSU air samplers

In addition to the wristband sampling project, OSU SRP Center researchers also have installed high volume air samplers to measure levels of particulate matter and PAHs on the Swinomish Reservation.
(Photo courtesy of the OSU SRP Center)

Researchers from the Oregon State University Superfund Research Program (OSU SRP) Center have collaborated with the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community (SITC) to measure potential exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The community-based participatory research project engaged residents in the research study.

PAHs are a large class of hazardous organic compounds commonly found in the environment and are among the top 10 contaminants of concern at Superfund sites in the United States. The SITC resides within 10 miles of two large oil refineries, which are major sources of PAHs, raising concern within the Swinomish community about PAH exposure and other impacts on air quality.

Together, OSU SRP Center researchers and the SITC initiated a study to learn more about PAH exposure in the community. Volunteers wore silicone wristband passive samplers for seven days and completed daily activity diaries about their contact with potential sources of PAHs. The researchers analyzed the wristbands for 62 different PAHs and found that all study participants were exposed to different amounts and types of PAHs. They also observed seasonal differences, detecting more PAHs in the winter than in the spring.

According to the researchers, this community-based participatory project raised awareness of PAH exposure in the Swinomish community. More importantly, the study empowered research participants to reduce their exposure to sources of PAHs in the home, including woodstoves, candles, and incense. After the study, participants reported using their woodstove less often for ambiance, getting their woodstove cleaned and serviced before using it the following season, and buying soy or beeswax candles that have lower PAH emissions.

February 14, 2019

Ramirez-Andreotta Receives 2019 AAAS Early Career Award for Public Engagement with Science

Monica Ramirez-Andreotta, Ph.D.

Ramirez-Andreotta was also the winner of the 14th annual SRP Karen Wetterhahn Award
(Photo courtesy of the University of Arizona)

Monica Ramirez-Andreotta, Ph.D., assistant professor in the department of soil, water, and environmental science at the University of Arizona (UA), is the winner of the 2019 Early Career Award for Public Engagement with Science, presented by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Ramirez-Andreotta is the leader of the UA Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center Research Translation Core and Training Core.

Ramirez-Andreotta, who studies soil and food quality, is being recognized for involving communities most affected by pollution, poor water quality, and food insecurity in the scientific process. Ramirez-Andreotta has headed several collaborative research projects that create science learning opportunities and engage community members in data collection, interpretation, and translation of results into action.

As part of the UA SRP Center, she launched Gardenroots in 2008, a citizen science project geared toward community members living near a hazardous mining waste site in Arizona. Ramirez-Andreotta and nearly 100 trained participants collected soil, water, and plant samples. Their work revealed that the public utility’s drinking water contained arsenic levels above the drinking water standard, a finding that resulted in the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality issuing a violation to the water supplier. Gardenroots worked with local water authorities and the owners of affected households to provide information about water treatment technologies designed to reduce arsenic concentrations in drinking water. The Gardenroots program has since grown into a nationwide initiative.

Ramirez-Andreotta also leads Project Harvest, a citizen science project that engages community health workers and more than 150 families living near sources of pollution in monitoring harvested rainwater, soil, and plants. To make the project accessible to community members, all materials are available in both English and Spanish. In addition to these large-scale projects, Ramirez-Andreotta conducts free screenings of soil for urban gardeners and organizes science events for children and families.

The AAAS Early Career Award for Public Engagement with Science was established in 2010 to recognize early-career scientists and engineers who demonstrate excellence in their contribution to public engagement with science activities. The award consists of a $5,000 honorarium, a commemorative plaque, and complimentary registration and travel to the AAAS Annual Meeting.

February 13, 2019

SRP Researchers Reflect on Sharing Research Results at PEPH Network Meeting

Environmental health science professionals came together to discuss reporting back research results at the annual NIEHS Partnerships for Environmental Public Health (PEPH) meeting, held Dec 13-14. Among the participants, members of several Superfund Research Program (SRP)-funded Centers shared their experiences and tools focused on reporting research results back to study participants. According to an NIEHS story, the meeting reflected a critical need to ensure that individuals and communities that are part of a research study have access to their data and information on what it means for their health.

Julia Brody, Ph.D.

Julia Brody, Ph.D., executive director of the Silent Spring Institute and Northeastern SRP Center partner, described how reporting back can be a source of learning for both community members and researchers.
(Photo courtesy of Steve McCaw)

SRP Health Scientist Administrator Michelle Heacock, Ph.D., led a session highlighting three SRP projects that have been reporting back individual results. The projects addressed unique exposures, as well as distinct cultural contexts, such as working with tribal communities.

Among the presenters in this session, Carmen Velez Vega, Ph.D., of the University of Puerto Rico and Northeastern SRP Center, discussed the continuing collaboration between their SRP Center and the Silent Spring Institute in developing the DERBI Report Back App. The Report Back App was launched on October 15, 2018 to provide a platform for cohort participants in Puerto Rico to directly access their own confidential data as well as cohort-wide research results. Several presenters throughout the meeting referenced the Silent Spring DERBI App and the corresponding Report Back Handbook as models for their own work.

Diana Rohlman, Ph.D., from the Oregon State University SRP Center, and Madeleine Scammell, Ph.D., from the Boston University SRP Center, also presented in the session, providing an overview of their report back projects and highlighting the strengths of the approach they used. They also described surprises and challenges they experienced and shared lessons learned.

In another session, Caroline Armijo, a ninth generation native of Stokes County, North Carolina, shared her perspective on partnering with University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) SRP researchers in response to the 2014 Dan River coal ash spill. After contacting the UNC SRP Center to help them understand their exposures and associated health risks, they established the Well Empowered Study to build capacity to prevent exposure to toxic metals in private wells.

University of Washington SRP Center Community Engagement Core coordinator Lisa Hayward led a workshop where she walked participants through the process of effective engagement planning to engage target communities in a research process. She also introduced a range of available tools, resources, and best practices to assist with effective engagement.

February 07, 2019

STEEP Gets Creative to Communicate Science

Fact sheet about PFAS exposure

STEEP's Tips Before Taps tip sheet
(Photo courtesy of the URI SRP Center website)

The University of Rhode Island Superfund Research Program (URI SRP) Center has produced a variety of resources to explain the potential effects of poly- and perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs) and ways to reduce exposure. The URI SRP Sources, Transport, Exposure, and Effects of PFASs (STEEP) Center is addressing the emerging and expanding problem of PFAS contamination.

PFASs are industrial compounds that have been used in many consumer products, such as non-stick cooking pans, due to their unique oil- and water-repellent properties. They also result from the use of aqueous film forming foams at airports, military installations, and firefighting training sites. PFASs are very stable and do not break down quickly, leading to long-term exposure and accumulation in humans and the environment.

The team created materials for a range of audiences, including coloring sheets geared toward younger and older children to help them identify potential sources of PFASs in the home, a four-page brochure with a plain-language overview of PFASs and the STEEP SRP Center, and a fact sheet with basic information about STEEP's goals, research projects, and cores. STEEP also initiated a study to test for PFASs in private drinking water wells on Cape Cod and made and distributed an informational flyer to provide details and guidance on how the Cape Cod residents could participate.

In addition to informing the public about potential sources, they also developed tip sheets with actionable ways to reduce PFAS exposure. For example, their Tips Before Taps two-page sheet includes ways to avoid PFASs in the home and tips for buying products without PFASs. They also created several tip sheets that use illustrations to convey important messages about PFASs. Tips for Infants provides important information about limiting PFAS exposure before, during, and after pregnancy. Tips for Families offers a short visual quiz to identify potential sources of PFASs in the home.

They also have created bookmarks, stickers, and other useful materials for the public and their stakeholders. These materials are helping the STEEP team to increase environmental health literacy, communicate their science, and support the needs of communities impacted by PFASs.

January 28, 2019

SRP Researchers Share Findings at Exposome Conference

Robert Wright speaking to an audience.

Wright gave introductory and closing remarks during the symposium.
(Photo courtesy of the Institute for Exposomic Research at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)

Current and former Superfund Research Program (SRP) researchers described their work and learned from others as part of the New York City Exposome Symposium Nov 2 – 3. The symposium delved into innovative approaches in exposomics, the study of how the complex mix of nutritional, chemical, and social environments shapes human health throughout the lifespan.

The meeting was organized by the Institute for Exposomic Research at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Robert Wright, M.D., a professor and chair of environmental medicine and public health at Mount Sinai, directs the institute. Wright previously worked with the Harvard University SRP Center for 20 years, where he progressed from a trainee to overall center director.

As part of the meeting, University of California, Berkeley SRP Center researcher Stephen Rappaport, Ph.D., described his work to capture diverse exposures and interactions between genes and the environment by measuring compounds in blood or other archived biospecimens. According to Rappaport, characterization of the exposome requires a battery of untargeted methods, notably metabolomics and proteomics, which are large-scale studies of metabolites and proteins. In addition to his work to characterize exposures based on blood samples, Rappaport also has shown that saliva may be a practical alternative to blood for characterizing a person's exposures. His work shows how saliva contains important molecular information and can be measured over time to construct individual exposure histories and discover risk factors for disease.

"I was surprised at the diversity of the audience and the new directions that they are taking to explore the exposome concept," Rappaport said of the meeting. "Although the exposome was originally conceived in the context of finding causes of cancer, researchers are now using exposomics to emphasize the vast range of exposures and how this knowledge can be used to identify and reduce disease risks."

Oregon State University SRP trainee Holly Dixon presented their research using silicone wristbands to assess personal chemical exposures. The simple wristbands and extraction method, developed with SRP and other NIEHS funding, can test exposure to 1,200 chemicals.

Manish Arora, Ph.D., a former trainee from the Harvard SRP Center and current Mount Sinai professor, discussed his research to uncover early-life exposures to chemical mixtures by analyzing chemical signatures in baby teeth.

The meeting covered challenges of generating high-quality untargeted chemical screens, methods to generate novel exposure data, wearable devices, and other new findings in the field. SRP researchers in attendance shared their innovative findings and learned new approaches to exposomics.

"No one is exposed to one chemical at a time," Wright said for a recent NIEHS feature. "Everything in life is a mixture, and if we are going to understand why people develop disease, we have to realize that all the factors around us – the built environment, chemicals, social stressors, and nutrition – interact synergistically. The multidisciplinary approach within SRP trained me to think holistically about the impacts of toxic waste and the importance of integrating social stressors, genetics, nutrition, and mixtures in environmental health research," he said.

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