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Your Environment. Your Health.

SRP Grantees Share Cutting Edge Research at EMGS

(From left): Zhang, Heacock, and Fry at the EMGS Annual Meeting.

(From left): Zhang, Heacock, and Fry at the EMGS Annual Meeting.
(Photo courtesy of Michelle Heacock)

At the 46th Annual Environmental Mutagenesis and Genomics Society (EMGS) meeting September 26-30, Superfund Research Program (SRP) grantees and staff gathered to discuss research aimed at understanding and mitigating environmental threats to the genome and to the epigenome.

The theme of the meeting focused on integrating research, education, and policy. The scientific program consisted of symposia, platform and poster sessions, Saturday workshops, and internationally recognized speakers. There was also a focus on cutting-edge technologies, including a Plenary Symposium on sequencing, genome editing, and what they promise as we look ahead.

SRP grantees from the University of California (UC) Berkeley and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) gave presentations on their innovative SRP research related to environmental mutagenesis. SRP Health Scientist Administrator Michelle Heacock, Ph.D., also attended the meeting.

In addition to a workshop presentation, Daniels also presented a poster on the effects of benzene metabolites on cellular iron status.
In addition to a workshop presentation, Daniels also presented a poster on the effects of benzene metabolites on cellular iron status.
(Photo courtesy of Michelle Heacock)

UNC SRP Center Director Rebecca Fry, Ph.D., gave two presentations. She discussed oral exposure to arsenic and health risks for children during the Health Risk Assessment of Oral Exposure to Arsenic session. She presented “Toxic Metals and the Epigenome” during the Environmental Epigenomics and Disease Susceptibility session.

UC Berkeley SRP Center researcher Luoping Zhang, Ph.D., also spoke during the Environmental Epigenomics and Disease Susceptibility session, presenting on, “Applying Biomarkers, Systems Biology, and Exposome Approaches to Study Environmental and Occupational Exposures to Toxic Chemicals.” A UC Berkeley SRP Center trainee Sarah Daniels gave a presentation, “Toward Exposomics,” at the Emerging Technologies workshop on the first day of the meeting.

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