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Child mental health and human capital accumulation: the case of ADHD

Environmental Health Economic Analysis Annotated Bibliography

Details

Research article Cost analysis (CA)
Authors
Currie J and Stabile M
Journal
Journal of Health Economics
Summary
The authors examined the effects of ADHD on child human capitol outcomes, including grade repetition, mathematics scores, reading scores, special education, and delinquency, using data from the Canadian National longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, and the American National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. They found that children with symptoms of hyperactivity suffered large negative consequences in terms of their test scores and schooling attainment. Furthermore, hyperactivity was a more important determinant of reduced human capital accumulation than chronic physical health problems, like asthma.
Population
Children and adolescents (4-11 years)

Health Outcomes

  • Neurological/cognitive outcomes (ADHD)

Environmental Agents

List of Environmental Agents: (Not available)

Source of Environmental Agents: (Not available)

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Type:

  • Cost analysis (CA)

Cost Measured:

  • Child's human capital accumulation captured using the following measures: grade repetition, mathematics scores, reading scores, special education, and delinquency

Potential Cost Measures: (Not available)

Benefits Measures: (Not available)

Potential Benefits: (Not available)

Location:

  • United States and Canada

Models Used: (Not available)

Methods Used:

  • The authors examined the effects of ADHD on child human capital outcomes using data from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth and the American National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The authors — 1) generated hyperactivity scores using results from surveys administered to the children, their parents, and their teachers; 2) estimated ordinary least squares (OLS) models of the relationship between hyperactivity scores in 1994 and child human capital outcomes in 1998, controlling for a wide range of other potentially confounding variables, such as maternal health status; 3) estimated sibling fixed effects models to control for omitted variables bias; 4) estimated OLS models to examine how ADHD outcomes are mediated by income; and 5) compared outcomes of ADHD to those of chronic health problems, such as asthma.

Sources Used:

  • Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth; American National Longitudinal Survey of Youth; results from hyperactivity surveys given to children and their parents and teachers; additional sources cited in publication

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Citation:

  • Currie J and Stabile M. 2006. Child mental health and human capital accumulation: the case of ADHD. Journal of Health Economics.

Pubmed:

DOI:

NIEHS Funding: (Not available)

Other Funding:

  • Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada