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Your Environment. Your Health.

What do we know about short- and long-term effects of early-life exposure to pollution?

Environmental Health Economic Analysis Annotated Bibliography

Details

Review Review of many types of economic evaluations
Authors
Currie J, Graff Zivin J, Mullins J, and Neidell M
Journal
Annual Review of Resource Economics
Summary
The authors reviewed the economic literature on the short- and long-term effects of early-life exposure to pollution. The literature provided both direct and indirect evidence that early-childhood exposure to pollution significantly affected later-life outcomes. The authors suggested that given the potentially long-lasting consequences from early exposure to pollution, the marginal returns to pollution control may be particularly high.
Population
Reviewed publications that examined early childhood, late childhood, and adulthood

Health Outcomes

  • Reviewed publications that examined birth outcomes (low birth weight
  • gestational age), Mortality (infant mortality), Respiratory outcomes (asthma)

Environmental Agents

List of Environmental Agents:

  • Reviewed publications that examined air pollutants (carbon monoxide (CO)
  • particulate matter (PM10/coarse)
  • sulfur dioxide (SO2)
  • ozone
  • lead), radiation

Source of Environmental Agents: (Not available)

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Type:

  • Review of many types of economic evaluations

Cost Measured:

  • Reviewed publications that examined costs related to educational attainment, test scores, school absence, decreased IQ, childhood hospitalizations, hospitalizations due to respiratory conditions (e.g., infection or asthma), and earnings

Potential Cost Measures: (Not available)

Benefits Measures:

  • Reviewed publications that examined benefits related to increased high school graduation rates, test scores, and adult earnings due to reduced pollution levels

Potential Benefits: (Not available)

Location: (Not available)

Models Used: (Not available)

Methods Used:

  • The authors reviewed the economic literature on the short- and long-term effects of early-life exposure to pollution. The authors — 1) developed a conceptual model that links pollution exposure and birth outcomes to health and human capital later in life; and 2) provided a structured reviewed of the literature, focusing on how early-life exposure to pollution affects outcomes in early childhood, late childhood, and adulthood.

Sources Used:

  • Chernobyl’s subclinical legacy: prenatal exposure to radioactive fallout and school outcomes in Sweden (Almond et al., 2009); Gray matters: pollution and human capital formation (Bharadwaj et al., 2013); This is only a test? Long-run impacts of prenatal exposure to radioactive downfall from nuclear weapon testing (Black et al., 2013); Air pollution and infant health: What can we learn from California’s recent experience? (Currie and Neidell, 2005); The impact of air pollution on infant mortality: evidence from geographic variation in pollution shocks induced by a recession (Chay and Greenstone, 2003); Do current levels of air pollution kill? The impact of air pollution on population mortality in England (Janke et al., (2009); Information, avoidance behavior, and health: the effect of ozone on asthma hospitalizations (Neidell, 2009); External health costs of a steel mill (Ransom and Pope, 1995); The impact of air pollution on cognitive performance and human capital formation (Lavy et al., 2012); Childhood lead and academic performance in Massachusetts (Reyes, 2011); Air pollution and academic performance: evidence from California schools (Zweig et al., 2009); additional sources cited in publication

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Citation:

  • Currie J, Graff Zivin J, Mullins J, and Neidell M. 2014. What do we know about short- and long-term effects of early-life exposure to pollution?. Annual Review of Resource Economics.

Pubmed:

DOI:

NIEHS Funding: (Not available)

Other Funding: (Not available)

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