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Impact of climate conditions on occupational health and related economic losses: a new feature of global and urban health in the context of climate change

Environmental Health Economic Analysis Annotated Bibliography

Details

Research article Cost analysis (CA)
Authors
Kjellstrom, T.
Journal
Asia Pac J Public Health
Summary
This study calculated the loss of work capacity due to heat exposure for 21 global regions at baseline (1960-1989) and future periods (2030 and 2050). By combining heat exposure data and estimates of economic consequences, the authors demonstrated the vulnerability of low- and middle-income countries to heat stress. Furthermore, they demonstrated that the annual cost of reduced labor productivity at country level in 2030 can be several percent of GDP. These results suggest an urgent need for effective climate change adaptation and mitigation policies and preventive actions in all countries.
Population
Indoor and outdoor workers

Health Outcomes

  • Heat stress

Environmental Agents

List of Environmental Agents:

  • Extreme weather/climate change (heat)

Source of Environmental Agents:

  • Work-related heat exposure

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Type:

  • Cost analysis (CA)

Cost Measured:

  • Lost economic output, work capacity, and labor productivity

Potential Cost Measures: (Not available)

Benefits Measures: (Not available)

Potential Benefits: (Not available)

Location:

  • 21 global regions, with a specific focus on Asia

Models Used: (Not available)

Methods Used:

  • The authors presented examples on estimates of lost economic output due to occupational heat stress, focusing on countries in Asia. They — 1) calculated heat data using Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) for different months and years; 2) used detailed regional and national data from the Climate Vulnerability Monitor (2012) report to calculate annual losses as a result of lost work hours, and these projections were used to calculate lost work capacity (reduced labor productivity); 3) used the global Hothaps program to gather produce estimates of heat conditions and trends; 4) mapped results from the Hothaps program to depict spatial distribution of workplace heat stress; and 5) calculated the loss of work capacity due to heat exposure for 21 global regions at baseline (1960-1989) and future periods (2030 and 2050).

Sources Used:

  • Hothaps-Soft program (www.ClimateCHIP.org); The "Hothaps" program for assessment of climate change impacts on occupational health and productivity: an invitation to carry out field studies (Kjellstrom et al., 2009); Climate Vulnerability Monitor (DARA, 2012); US National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) publicly available data; Climate Research Unit data (University of East Anglia, UK); Hot environments: estimation of the heat stress on working man, based on the WBGT-Index (International Standards Organization, 1989); additional sources cited in publication

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Citation:

  • Kjellstrom, T.. 2016. Impact of climate conditions on occupational health and related economic losses: a new feature of global and urban health in the context of climate change. Asia Pac J Public Health.

Pubmed:

DOI: (Not available)

NIEHS Funding: (Not available)

Other Funding:

  • Australian National University
  • Umea University (Sweden)
  • Tromso University (Norway)
  • Pufendorf Institute, Lund University (Sweden)