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Your Environment. Your Health.

Monetary benefits of preventing childhood lead poisoning with lead-safe window replacement

Environmental Health Economic Analysis Annotated Bibliography

Details

Research article Cost-benefit analysis (CBA)
Authors
Nevin R, Jacobs DE, Berg M, and Cohen J
Journal
Environmental Research
Summary
The authors used a cost–benefit analysis to quantify the health benefits, costs, market value benefits, and energy savings of lead-safe window replacement and suggested that the intervention would yield net monetary benefits of at least $67 billion and 15-25% reduction in energy costs. In addition, such a window replacement effort would reduce peak demand for electricity, carbon emissions from power plants, and associated long-term costs of climate change.
Population
Children (1-5 years)

Health Outcomes

  • Neurological/cognitive outcomes (IQ deficits, ADHD)

Environmental Agents

List of Environmental Agents:

  • Metals (lead)

Source of Environmental Agents:

  • Lead-based paint in old windows/window panes

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Type:

  • Cost-benefit analysis (CBA)

Cost Measured:

  • Cost of lead-safe window replacement

Potential Cost Measures:

  • Lead paint litigation
  • special property maintenance
  • stress on parents
  • premature mortality/memory loss from lead exposure in childhood
  • treatment of dental caries associated with lead exposure
  • hearing loss
  • liver, kidney and other diseases associated with lead exposure

Benefits Measures:

  • Lifetime earnings

Potential Benefits:

  • Benefits of avoided healthcare costs associated with neurobehavioral/developmental outcomes (e.g., ADHD, mental retardation)
  • benefits of other avoided medical costs of childhood lead exposure (e.g., chelation, follow-up, monitoring, physician visits, etc.)
  • benefits of avoided special education
  • housing market value benefits
  • energy savings (e.g., reduction in peak demand for electricity, carbon emissions from power plants, long-term costs of climate change)

Location: (Not available)

Models Used: (Not available)

Methods Used:

  • The authors quantified health benefits, costs, market value benefits, energy savings, and net economic benefits of lead-safe window replacement. The authors — 1) estimated trends in preschool blood lead and blood lead reduction from window replacement from NHANES and NSLAH data; 2) calculated lifetime earnings and other benefits from lead-safe window replacement per resident child in housing units; and 3) calculated lead-safe window replacement costs and energy savings from US Department of Housing and Urban Development data.

Sources Used:

  • US EPA (1986, 2003); US Department of Housing and Urban development (1999); NHANES (1999-2002); National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing (NSLAH, 1999-2000); additional sources cited in publication

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Citation:

  • Nevin R, Jacobs DE, Berg M, and Cohen J. 2008. Monetary benefits of preventing childhood lead poisoning with lead-safe window replacement. Environmental Research.

Pubmed:

DOI:

NIEHS Funding: (Not available)

Other Funding: (Not available)

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