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Cost-consequence analysis of multimodal interventions with environmental components for pediatric asthma in the state of Maryland

Environmental Health Economic Analysis Annotated Bibliography

Details

Research article Cost-benefit analysis (CBA), Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA)
Authors
Jassal MS, Diette GB, and Dowdy DW
Journal
Journal of Asthma
Summary
This study estimated the expenditures and savings of environmental interventions for asthma in the state of Maryland. The researchers found that single- and multi-component environmental strategies were cost-saving relative to the standard of care, with home environmental education using non-medical professionals yielding the highest net savings of $14.1 million. These results lend support for wider deployment of comprehensive management strategies that address environmental determinants of childhood asthma.
Population
Pediatric patients (children and adolescents ≤ 18 years)

Health Outcomes

  • Respiratory outcomes (asthma)

Environmental Agents

List of Environmental Agents:

  • Home-based environmental asthma triggers

Source of Environmental Agents: (Not available)

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Type:

  • Cost-benefit analysis (CBA)
  • Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA)

Cost Measured:

  • Healthcare costs such as hospitalizations, emergency room visits and asthma-related clinic visits
  • costs of lost work productivity
  • costs of travel incurred during the usage of healthcare services
  • educational costs for interventions
  • training costs for medical professionals
  • costs for follow-up visits (e.g., training supplies and transportation)
  • costs for implementation of interventions (e.g., cost of allergen-impermeable covers, pest management, etc.)

Potential Cost Measures:

  • Incremental costs of acute and chronic asthma medications
  • cost of lost leisure time
  • employer friction costs
  • quality of life

Benefits Measures:

  • Averted healthcare costs and parameters such as hospitalizations, emergency room and clinic/urgent care visits
  • averted costs related to lost worker productivity

Potential Benefits:

  • Reduction of asthma medication use

Location:

  • Maryland

Models Used: (Not available)

Methods Used:

  • The authors performed a cost-consequence analysis of environmental strategies for asthma control using data from published studies. The authors — 1) used decision analysis to estimate all incremental costs and benefits, from a societal perspective, of selected environmental strategies for asthma control; 2) determined the appropriate study interventions, by performing a meta-analysis of studies describing environmental strategies for asthma control; 3) constructed a hypothetical study population using data on health encounters in 2009 within the state of Maryland from the 2011 Maryland Asthma Surveillance Report (MASR); and 4) calculated the costs parameters related to asthma and the implementation of the asthma control interventions.

Sources Used:

  • Maryland Asthma Control Program, Maryland Asthma Surveillance Report (MASR) (Bankowski et al., 2011); CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS); Youth Tobacco Surveys (YTS); Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS); Ambulatory Care and Hospital Discharge Profiles (Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission (HSCRC)); Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2011); Allergy Control Products (Duluth, Georgia, USA); Health Services Cost Review Commission (2012); additional sources cited in publication

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Citation:

  • Jassal MS, Diette GB, and Dowdy DW. 2013. Cost-consequence analysis of multimodal interventions with environmental components for pediatric asthma in the state of Maryland. Journal of Asthma.

Pubmed:

DOI:

NIEHS Funding: (Not available)

Other Funding: (Not available)