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The global burden of disease for skin, lung, and bladder cancer caused by arsenic in food

Environmental Health Economic Analysis Annotated Bibliography

Details

Research article
Authors
Oberoi S, Barchowsky A, and Wu F
Journal
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Summary
This quantitative risk assessment study estimated the global burden of disease for bladder, lung, and skin cancers attributable to inorganic arsenic exposures in food. They estimated that each year, 9,129 to 119,176 additional cases of bladder cancer, 11,844 to 121,442 of lung cancer, and 10,729 to 110,015 of skin cancer worldwide are attributable to inorganic arsenic in food. The authors conclude that risk estimates are valuable for informing and supporting policies to reduce the global burden of disease from arsenic exposures in food.
Population
Not available

Health Outcomes

  • Cancer outcomes (skin cancer, lung cancer, bladder cancer)

Environmental Agents

List of Environmental Agents:

  • Metal (inorganic arsenic)

Source of Environmental Agents:

  • Diet

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Type: (Not available)

Cost Measured: (Not available)

Potential Cost Measures: (Not available)

Benefits Measures: (Not available)

Potential Benefits: (Not available)

Location: (Not available)

Models Used:

  • Dose-response model with a linear function of dose and quadratic function of age
  • exposure assessment model

Methods Used:

  • The authors estimated the global burden of disease for bladder, lung, and skin cancers attributable to inorganic arsenic in food. The authors — 1) established dose response estimates by converting dose response estimates for water exposure to human dose; 2) estimated exposure using data on a common range of arsenic content for food crops grown in different parts of the world and dietary patterns in different parts of the world; 3) multiplied the dose-response slope factor with the estimated range of daily dietary inorganic arsenic exposure to characterize cancer risk; and 4) summed across different populations to estimate the global burden of a particular arsenic-induced cancer.

Sources Used:

  • Global Environment Monitoring System-Food Contamination Monitoring and Assessment Programme (GEMS/Food) (World Health Organization 2006); Risk of internal cancers from arsenic in drinking water (Morales et al., 2000); United States Environmental Protection Agency Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Arsenic, inorganic (1998); WHO Food Additives Series: 63. Safety evaluation of certain contaminants in food (Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, 2011); EFSA panel on contaminants in the food chain: Scientific opinion on arsenic in food (EFSA, 2009); additional sources cited in publication

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Citation:

  • Oberoi S, Barchowsky A, and Wu F. 2014. The global burden of disease for skin, lung, and bladder cancer caused by arsenic in food. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev.

Pubmed:

DOI:

NIEHS Funding:

  • R01ES0138781

Other Funding:

  • WHO Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Group
  • National Cancer Institute (R01CA153073)