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Your Environment. Your Health.

Household cooking with solid fuels contributes to ambient PM2.5 air pollution and the burden of disease

Environmental Health Economic Analysis Annotated Bibliography

Details

Research article Cost analysis (CA)
Authors
Chafe ZA, Brauer M, Klimont Z, Van Dingenen R, Mehta S, Rao S, Riahi K, Dentener F, and Smith KR
Journal
Environ Health Perspect
Summary
This cost analysis estimated the ill health effects associated with population-wide exposure to ambient PM2.5 caused by household cooking with solid fuels on the basis of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2010 project for the years 1990, 2005, and 2010 in 170 countries. The study authors determined that exposure to ambient PM2.5 caused the loss of 370,000 lives and 9.9 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) globally in 2010. These results suggest that efforts to improve ambient air quality, especially in countries within South and East Asia (e.g., India and China, respectively), will be hindered if household cooking conditions are not addressed.
Population
Not available

Health Outcomes

  • Mortality

Environmental Agents

List of Environmental Agents:

  • Air pollutants (particulate matter (PM 2.5/fine))

Source of Environmental Agents:

  • Household cooking with solid fuels

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Type:

  • Cost analysis (CA)

Cost Measured:

  • Deaths
  • disability-adjusted life years (DALYs)

Potential Cost Measures: (Not available)

Benefits Measures: (Not available)

Potential Benefits: (Not available)

Location:

  • 170 countries grouped by region

Models Used:

  • Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies (GAINS) models were used to calculate proportion of household PM2.5 emissions that comes from cooking
  • Fast Scenario Screening Tool for Global Air Quality and Instantaneous Radiative Forcing paired with T5 (TM5-FASST), a global chemical transport model, was used to calculate proportion of ambient PM2.5 that comes from household combustion
  • Global burden of disease model was used to calculate ill health resulting from exposure to outdoor PM2.5 air pollution

Methods Used:

  • The authors estimated the proportion and concentrations of ambient PM2.5 attributable to household cooking with solid fuels for the years 1990, 2005, and 2010 in 170 countries, and examined ill health associated with exposures to ambient PM2.5. The authors — 1) used the GAINS and TM5-FASST models to estimate the proportion of ambient PM2.5 produced by households; 2) used the GAINS and TM5-FASST models to estimate the proportion of household PM2.5 emissions from cooking with solid fuels; and 3) estimated health effects using global burden of disease data from 2010 on ill health from ambient PM2.5 exposure.

Sources Used:

  • Global burden of disease (GBD) 2010 project (IHME 2010); additional sources cited in publication

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Citation:

  • Chafe ZA, Brauer M, Klimont Z, Van Dingenen R, Mehta S, Rao S, Riahi K, Dentener F, and Smith KR. 2014. Household cooking with solid fuels contributes to ambient PM2.5 air pollution and the burden of disease. Environ Health Perspect.

Pubmed:

DOI:

NIEHS Funding: (Not available)

Other Funding: (Not available)

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