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Your Environment. Your Health.

Application of a cost-benefit analysis model to the use of flame retardants

Environmental Health Economic Analysis Annotated Bibliography

Details

Research article Cost-benefit analysis (CBA)
Authors
Mcnamee MS and Anderson P
Journal
Fire Technol
Summary
This study applied a fire cost-benefit analysis (CBA) model in different scenarios of a 2003-based case study in Sweden comparing television (TV) sets containing/not containing flame retardants. For all tested scenarios, the benefits of a high level of fire performance in a TV set far outweighed the costs associated with obtaining that high level of fire safety, where the net benefit ranged from $49 to $1073 million US dollars per year. This study is the first attempt to establish monetary costs and benefits associated with the use of flame retardants in televisions.
Population
Not available

Health Outcomes

  • Not available

Environmental Agents

List of Environmental Agents:

  • Brominated compounds (polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, e.g., decaBDE))

Source of Environmental Agents:

  • Flame retardants in television (TV) sets

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Type:

  • Cost-benefit analysis (CBA)

Cost Measured:

  • Calculated incremental costs associated with an increase in fire safety via the fire cost-benefit analysis model by considering the following: cost difference between resins used for TV manufacture
  • costs of lives saved
  • costs associated with treatment of fire victim injuries
  • societal losses and costs associated with fire victim deaths
  • cost of flame retardants
  • cost of recycling
  • value of statistical life (VSL)
  • average cost per fire
  • cost for house construction
  • health costs: costs associated with disposal or inclusion of products in fire

Potential Cost Measures:

  • Absolute costs associated with flame or non-flame retarded products, such as: environmental or eco-toxicological costs
  • costs of raw materials for production
  • costs associated with use
  • transport costs
  • cost of fire-fighting
  • cost of post-fire clean-up
  • costs for replacement of destroyed or damaged equipment

Benefits Measures:

  • Calculated incremental benefits associated with an increase in fire safety via the fire cost-benefit analysis model by considering the following: lives saved through the avoidance of TV fires
  • avoided injuries
  • avoided house fires
  • avoided TV fires
  • capital costs through fires averted

Potential Benefits:

  • Absolute benefits associated with flame or non-flame retarded products, such as: environmental or eco-toxicological benefits

Location:

  • Sweden, European Union

Models Used:

  • Authors developed the fire cost-benefit analysis (CBA) model (which is analogous to the fire life cycle assessment (LCA) model)

Methods Used:

  • Authors performed a cost-benefit analysis of effects associated with exposure to flame retardants in TV sets and fires. The authors — 1) developed a fire cost-benefit analysis (CBA) model; 2) applied the fire CBA model to a 2003-based case study comparing cathode ray tube television (CRT TV) sets containing flame retardants in the outer enclosure compared to those that did not; 3) tested nine scenarios for the CRT TV set application of the fire CBA model; and 4) performed several calculations to show the influence of different input parameters on the benefits of house fires saved.

Sources Used:

  • Civil Contingencies Agency Incident Database (IDA) (http://ida.msb.se/ida2#page=a0087); Televisions by country, CIA World Factbook, Dec. 2003 (http://www.nationmaster. com/graph/med_tel-media-televisions); Swedish Insurance Federation (http://www.svenskforsakring.se/Huvudmeny/Fakta-Statistik/Statistics-list/); additional sources cited in publication

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Citation:

  • Mcnamee MS and Anderson P. 2015. Application of a cost-benefit analysis model to the use of flame retardants. Fire Technol.

Pubmed: (Not available)

DOI:

NIEHS Funding: (Not available)

Other Funding:

  • Bromine Science and Environmental Forum (BSEF)
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