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The geographic distribution and economic value of climate change-related ozone health impacts in the United States in 2030

Environmental Health Economic Analysis Annotated Bibliography

Details

Research article Cost analysis (CA)
Authors
Fann N, Nolte CG, Dolwick P, Spero TL, Brown AC, Phillips S, and Anenberg S
Journal
J Air Waste Manag Assoc
Summary
This cost-analysis study estimated the influence of near-term climate change on ozone-related health impacts in the continental U.S. and the economic burden of those health impacts. The authors estimated that ozone levels will result in tens to thousands of additional ozone-related premature deaths and illnesses per year, as well as an economic burden of hundreds of millions to tens of billions of U.S. dollars.
Population
Not available

Health Outcomes

  • Mortality (premature deaths)
  • respiratory outcomes

Environmental Agents

List of Environmental Agents:

  • Ozone

Source of Environmental Agents:

  • Anthropogenic sources

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Type:

  • Cost analysis (CA)

Cost Measured:

  • Respiratory emergency department visits
  • respiratory hospital admissions
  • cases of acute respiratory symptoms
  • lost school days

Potential Cost Measures: (Not available)

Benefits Measures: (Not available)

Potential Benefits: (Not available)

Location:

  • Continental United States

Models Used:

  • NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Model E2
  • National Center for Atmospheric Research/Department of Energy Community Earth System Model
  • Weather Research and Forecasting Model
  • Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model
  • GEOS-Chemic global chemical transport model
  • Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program-Community Edition

Methods Used:

  • The authors estimated the influence of near-term climate change on ozone, and the resulting health impacts and economic burden of those health impacts. The authors — 1) used two general circulation models (GCM) driven by different greenhouse gas forcing scenarios to estimate changes in air quality due to climate change; 2) used a weather research and forecasting model to downscale GCM projections to the United States; 3) used Community Multi-scale Air Quality model to assess how climate-driven meteorological changes would impact near-surface ozone levels over continental U.S.; 4) used a health impact function to estimate health impacts associated with near-surface ozone levels; 5) used both cost of illness and willingness to pay measures to estimate the economic value of the health impacts of climate change on air quality; and 6) used value of statistical life to characterize the economic value of ozone-related premature deaths.

Sources Used:

  • U.S. EPA estimates of 2030 ozone levels; Regulatory Impact Analysis for the Particulate Matter NAAQS (EPA, 2012); Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios (EPA, 2009; Bierwage et al., 2010); Wide Ranging OnLine Data for Epidemiologic Research (CDC Wonder, 2008); U.S. Census Bureau; EPA Science Advisory Board-recommended value of statistical life (EPA Health Effects Subcommittee, 2010); additional sources cited in publication

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Citation:

  • Fann N, Nolte CG, Dolwick P, Spero TL, Brown AC, Phillips S, and Anenberg S. 2015. The geographic distribution and economic value of climate change-related ozone health impacts in the United States in 2030. J Air Waste Manag Assoc.

Pubmed:

DOI:

NIEHS Funding: (Not available)

Other Funding: (Not available)