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Your Environment. Your Health.

The need for policies to reduce the costs of cleaner cooking in low income settings: Implications from systematic analysis of costs and benefits

Environmental Health Economic Analysis Annotated Bibliography

Details

Research article Cost benefit analysis (CBA)
Authors
Jeuland M, Soo JST, Shindell D
Journal
Energy Policy
Summary
This cost-benefit analysis calculated private and social costs and benefits of adapting cleaner household cookstoves and analyzed effects of stove and fuel cost subsidies on the net benefits. The authors found that household private benefits do not usually outweigh the costs of cleaner cookstove improvements, but that overall social benefits are typically positive and large. Fuel subsidies could improve private net benefits but might not be sufficient to make cleaner cookstoves attractive to many households and stove subsidies modestly improve private outcomes. The authors concluded that new and effective incentives may be needed to support household use of efficient stoves in order to capture the large, broader social benefits.
Population
People who use cookstoves and were included in published empirical research studies about transitioning to cleaner cookstove use (ages not specified)

Health Outcomes

  • Mortality
  • Respiratory outcomes (acute respiratory infections, acute lower respiratory infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD))
  • Cancer outcomes (lung cancer)
  • Cardiovascular outcomes (ischemic heart disease)

Environmental Agents

List of Environmental Agents:

  • Air pollutants (carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), methane (CH4), nonmethane hydrocarbons, organic carbon)

Source of Environmental Agents:

  • Cookstoves

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Type:

  • Cost benefit analysis (CBA)

Cost Measured:

  • Capital costs (costs of new technologies, improved cookstoves, ventilation / cooking space improvements, etc.)
  • Cost of implementation and delivery (marketing and promotion materials, non-governmental organization and governmental staff time, etc.)
  • Operation and maintenance costs (cost of replacing / cleaning of equipment including time)
  • Cost of fuel in collection, preparation time, and money
  • Learning and tastes costs (costs of familiarization with the use of a new stove technology, loss of value from modified tastes)
  • Deforestation and forest degradation (replacement costs for trees)
  • Social cost of carbon for non-CO2 emissions converted to temporally consistent (discounted) carbon dioxide equivalents based on global mean temperature impacts

Potential Cost Measures:

  • Additional measures of the inconveniences of the stoves (e.g., lacking as a source of heat, inconvenience, taste problems)

Benefits Measures:

  • Morbidity and mortality reduction
  • reduced incidence of and mortality from disease (acute respiratory infections especially acute lower respiratory infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer, ischemic heart disease)
  • Time savings as reduced cooking time due to more efficient heating
  • costs saved for fuel no longer used in stove
  • Spillover morbidity and mortality reduction from above stated diseases due to reduced ambient pollution
  • Health valuation concepts are avoided cost-of-illness per case or per year for morbidity, and the value of a statistical life for reduced mortality
  • Climate- and ecosystem-related benefits from reduced emissions of black carbon (reduced social cost of carbon for non-CO2 emissions converted to temporally consistent (discounted) carbon dioxide equivalents based on global mean temperature impacts
  • Decreased tree cutting using replacement cost of trees
  • Changes in energy security

Potential Benefits:

  • Health benefits from reductions in other health conditions and reductions in other pollutants
  • Morbidity reduction benefits not included in cost-of-illness measures
  • Aesthetic benefits from cleaner stoves
  • Benefits from reduced loss of ecosystem services
  • Benefits of reduced risk of violence during fuel harvesting
  • changes in energy security

Location: (Not available)

Models Used: (Not available)

Methods Used:

  • The authors calculated private and social costs and benefits of switching to a cleaner cookstove using a data-driven simulation approach, building on a previous methodology, by gathering data for these analyses from published studies of costs and benefits of populations who adapted the cleaner cookstoves. The authors — 1) used the extracted data to compare the economic attractiveness of different stove alternatives relative to the baseline of unimproved biomass-burning stoves using a net benefits criterion; 2) analyzed benefits individually and in categories of private, limited social, or broader social benefits; 3) used welfare-theoretic (not income) measures of benefits and costs; 4) used equations for calculations of costs and benefits that are explained in detail in the Supplemental Materials; 5) ran 10,000 Monte Carlo simulation trials to generate ranges and distributions of net benefits for each improved cookstove; 6) compiled cost / benefits into private benefits, narrowly defined social / societal benefits, and broadly defined social / societal benefits; and 7) analyzed how distributions of private benefits were affected by fuel and stove price discounts; 8) performed sensitivity analyses to identify which parameters drive variation in the simulation results.

Sources Used:

  • 178 peer-reviewed articles, reports, books, and working papers identified through searches in Econlit and Google Scholar using an incluse approach for search terms; relevant data was extracted from the source data into a database for further analysis; social cost of carbon (Interagency Working Group on Social Cost of Carbon, 2015) for non-CO2 emissions converted to temporally consistent (discounted) carbon dioxide equivalents based on global mean temperature impacts (Shindell 2015); value of a statistical life for reduced mortality (Viscusi and Aldy, 2003); additional sources cited in the publication

Economic Evaluation / Methods and Source

Citation:

  • Jeuland M, Soo JST, Shindell D. 2018. The need for policies to reduce the costs of cleaner cooking in low income settings: Implications from systematic analysis of costs and benefits. Energy Policy.
  • Pubmed: (Not available)
  • DOI

NIEHS Funding: (Not available)

Other Funding:

  • Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves (UNF 39687)
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