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Your Environment. Your Health.

Dahea You, Pharm.D., Ph.D.

Molecular Toxicology & Genomics Group

portrait of Dahea You
Dahea You, Pharm.D., Ph.D.
Fellow — IRTA Postdoctoral
Tel 984-287-3149
dahea.you@nih.gov
P.O. Box 12233
Mail Drop K2-17
Durham, N.C. 27709

Dahea You is a postdoctoral fellow in the Biomolecular Screening Branch (BSB) of the Division of National Toxicology Program (DNTP).

Under the mentorship by Drs. Alison Harrill and Nisha Sipes, Dahea works on two Tox 21 federal interagency collaborative projects. The overall goal of her research is to improve toxicity screening and human health risk assessment by using a data-driven approach that comprehensively investigates and quantifies population variability across diverse cell lines. To achieve this goal, she aims to (1) investigate toxicodynamic variability and underlying mode of action of xenobiotics in a genetically diverse population of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from Diversity Outbred (DO) individual mice (cross partner project no. 7); and (2) optimize query of biological space in high throughput in vitro screening by selecting human cell lines with divergent tissue origins and transcriptional characteristics (cross partner project no. 2).

Dahea earned her Pharm.D. (Doctor of Pharmacy) from Rutgers University Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy in 2014, and Ph.D. in Toxicology from Rutgers Joint Graduate Program in Toxicology in 2019. Her dissertation, on which she worked under the mentorship of Drs. Lauren Aleksunes and Jason Richardson, investigated the epigenetic regulation of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier using both in vitro (immortalized human brain capillary endothelial (hCMEC/D3) cells) and in vivo (C57BL/6 mouse brains) models.

Selected Publications

  1. You D, Wen X, Gorczyca L, Morris A, Richardson JR, Aleksunes LM. 2019. Histone acetylation is a novel epigenetic mechanism to regulate human blood-brain barrier transporters. Mol Neurobiol. Doi: 10.1007/s12035-019-1565-7. [Epub ahead of print] [Abstract You D, Wen X, Gorczyca L, Morris A, Richardson JR, Aleksunes LM. 2019. Histone acetylation is a novel epigenetic mechanism to regulate human blood-brain barrier transporters. Mol Neurobiol. Doi: 10.1007/s12035-019-1565-7. [Epub ahead of print]]
  2. You D, Shin H, Mosaad F, Richardson JR, Aleksunes LM. 2019. Brain region-specific regulation of histone acetylation and efflux transporters in mice. J Biochem Mol Toxicol. E22318. Doi: 10.1002/jbt.22318. [Epub ahead of print] [Abstract You D, Shin H, Mosaad F, Richardson JR, Aleksunes LM. 2019. Brain region-specific regulation of histone acetylation and efflux transporters in mice. J Biochem Mol Toxicol. E22318. Doi: 10.1002/jbt.22318. [Epub ahead of print]]
  3. George B, You D, Joy M, Aleksunes LM. 2017. Xenobiotic transporters and kidney injury. Invited Review. Adv Drug Deliv Rev 116:73-91. [Abstract George B, You D, Joy M, Aleksunes LM. 2017. Xenobiotic transporters and kidney injury. Invited Review. Adv Drug Deliv Rev 116:73-91.]
  4. Bright AS, Herrera-Garcia G, Moscovitz JE, You D, Guo GL, Aleksunes LM. 2016. Regulation of drug disposition gene expression in pregnant mice with Car receptor activation. Nucl Receptor Res 3 pii: 101193. [Abstract Bright AS, Herrera-Garcia G, Moscovitz JE, You D, Guo GL, Aleksunes LM. 2016. Regulation of drug disposition gene expression in pregnant mice with Car receptor activation. Nucl Receptor Res 3 pii: 101193.]
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