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Your Environment. Your Health.

Katelyn S. Lavrich, Ph.D.

Molecular Toxicology & Genomics Group

Katelyn Lavrich
Katelyn S. Lavrich, Ph.D.
Fellow — IRTA Postdoctoral
Tel 984-287-3197
katelyn.lavrich@nih.gov
530 Davis Dr
Keystone Building
Durham, NC 27713

Katelyn S. Lavrich, Ph.D. is an Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) Postdoctoral Fellow in the Biomolecular Screening Branch of the Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP) at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. She is also adjunct in the Predictive Toxicology Screening Group of the National Toxicology Program Laboratories.

In her current role, Lavrich is developing 3D organotypic hepatic models for high-throughput toxicologic screening. Using novel data-rich methods, including transcriptomics and high content imaging, she is optimizing best practices and evaluating the translational utility of 3D hepatocyte spheroids for chemical safety screening. Additionally, Lavrich has interest in interindividual susceptibility to toxicants and the safety evaluation of botanical dietary supplements. The goal of her work is to advance the translational applicability of in vitro hepatic models and improve predictive toxicology testing.

Lavrich earned her B.S. in Biochemistry, with a minor in Environmental Studies from the Binghamton University – State University of New York. She received her Ph.D. in Toxicology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill under the mentorship of Dr. James M. Samet. Her dissertation research investigated air pollutant-induced oxidative stress and bioenergetic effects in the lungs.

Selected Publications

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