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Missouri University of Science and Technology

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In-situ Sediment Remediation Using Benthic Waterjet Amendment

Joel G. Burken

Grant Number: R01ES16158
Funding Period: 2008-2011
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The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act provided supplement funds to research at Missouri University of Science and Technology for water jet amendment placement. The goal is to broaden the plan towards accelerating the process and improving the potential to achieve goals in a timely manner. In order to better evaluate the waterjet placement of amendments specific objectives were developed for this research supplement. The supplement directly employed more graduate students and a research technician to accelerate progress to develop depth-specific solid phase microextraction methods for getting accurate and precise quantification of contaminant availability as a measure of depth, particularly for in situ sediments contaminated with organic contaminants that are targeted in this research endeavor. By developing the depth-specific assessment tools, the waterjet amendment addition can be targeted accurately. The supplement will also help evaluate the impacts of water jetting on biological sediments amendments as recent research has indicated novel potential for biological degradation of PCBs. Advancement of microbial PCB degradation offers a new approach to remediating PCB contaminated sediments, which the combination of water jetting and microbial amendments offer a new concept in sediment remediation, with little impact. In completing these supplemental objectives the researchers accelerate the pace of developing a pilot scale sediment amendment delivery system and test the system for delivery and sediment remediation at a contaminated field site. This will greatly accelerate the technology towards application and health-related impacts through decreasing water body loading of PCBs, PAHs, pesticides and other contaminants from historically contaminated sediments.

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