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Your Environment. Your Health.

Public Health Impacts

Superfund Research Program

One of the primary goals of SRP-funded research is to improve public health. Thus, the Program supports a wide range of research to address the broad public health concerns arising from the release of hazardous substances into the environment. The intent is to provide sound science to those making public policy, regulatory, and risk reduction decisions. SRP-funded research has been successful in this area as studies have improved our understanding and minimizing the health effects associated with exposures to environmental contaminants. The following stories provide information on public health impacts. They are merely highlights and represent the breadth of work SRP researchers undertake. To see older stories, visit our archives page.

UNC Superfund scientists study effects of Dan River coal ash spill

UNC Superfund scientists study effects of Dan River coal ash spill

One of the largest coal ash spills in the nation’s history began Feb. 2 in Eden, North Carolina, at a Duke Energy containment pond on the banks of the Dan River. One of the largest coal ash spills in the nation’s history began Feb. 2 in Eden, North Carolina, at a Duke Energy containment pond on the banks of the Dan River. Read more...

Arsenic in well water may diminish intelligence in children

girl drinking water

Evidence of a long-suspected connection between arsenic exposure and decreased intelligence among children is reported in a new study by NIEHS-funded scientists from Columbia University, published in the journal Environmental Health. Although the researchers conducted similar studies with children in Bangladesh, this study is the first of its kind in the U.S. to show an association between exposure to arsenic in drinking water and decreased intellectual function. Read more...

SRP Student Highlight: Oleksii Motorykin, Oregon State University

Oleksii Motorykin

Oleksii Motorykin, a Superfund Research Program (SRP) trainee at Oregon State University (OSU), found for the first time that lung cancer deaths are linked to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions that pollute the air, independent of cigarette smoke. As a result of his hard work and discoveries, Motorykin received two prestigious awards from the Division of Environmental Chemistry of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in 2013. Read More...

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