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Your Environment. Your Health.

Contaminated Sediments: New Tools and Approaches for in situ Remediation

Superfund Research Program

Session I:


November 17, 2010; 2:00 - 4:00pm ET
For an archive of this webinar please refer to EPA's Clu-in Training & Events webpage 

 

  • Moderator: Karl Gustavson, Environmental Toxicologist, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center Duty Station: Contaminated Sediments Team, USEPA OSRTI
  • Presenter: Dr. Peggy O'Day  , School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced
  • Presenter: Dr. Tom Sheahan  , Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northeastern University

 

This seminar featured SRP grantees Dr. Peggy O’Day (University of California - Merced) and Dr. Tom Sheahan (Northeastern University), and was moderated by Karl Gustavson (US EPA). Dr. O’Day presented an overview of different types of reactive amendments, mechanisms and chemistry associated with contaminant sequestration, examples of recent applications, and opportunities for the use of new materials and delivery methods. Dr. Sheahan described a bench-scale experimental study to examine the efficacy of the reactive geocomposite mats or overlays (RCM) to isolate and partially remediate PCB- and PAH-contaminated sediment, and to provide sufficient sequestering functionality to minimize biouptake by organisms in clean sediment overlying the RCM. He presented the results from a series of tests on spiked natural sediment using a new device developed for this research, the Integrated Contaminated Sediment Testing Apparatus Column (ICSTAC).

 

The Superfund Research Program (SRP), in collaboration with the US Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI), presents the Fall/Winter 2010 edition of Risk eLearning: "Contaminated Sediments: New Tools and Approaches for in situ Remediation."


 

Session II:

 

December 8, 2010; 2:00 - 4:00pm ET
For an archive of this webinar please refer to EPA's Clu-in Training & Events webpage 

 

  • Moderator: Steve Ells, Leader of the Sediments Team in EPA's Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation
  • Presenter: Dr. Upal Ghosh, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
  • Presenter: Dr. Joel Burken, Environmental Research Center, Missouri University of Science and Technology

 

This seminar featured SRP grantees Dr. Upal Ghosh (Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County) and Dr. Joel Burken (Professor of Civil, Architectural & Environmental Engineering and Interim Director of the Environmental Research Center, Missouri University of Science and Technology). Dr. Ghosh presented an overview of ongoing research on activated carbon amendments to reduce contaminant bioavailability in sediments. This in situ technique binds toxic chemicals in sediments and reduces their exposure to the aquatic food web. Dr. Burken presented his research describing using a traditionally high pressure waterjet in a new and innovative manner to inject remediation amendments like powdered activated carbon at varying depths in contaminated sediments. This method also decreases contaminant bioavailability, minimizes resuspension and the impact on benthic communities.


 

Session III:


January 19, 2011; 2:00 - 4:00pm ET
For an archive of this webinar please refer to EPA's Clu-in Training & Events webpage  

 

  • Moderator: Linda Fiedler, Environmental Engineer, EPA Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation
  • Presenter: Dr. Richard G. Luthy  , Silas H. Palmer Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University
  • Presenter: Dr. Charles A. Menzie, Principal Scientist & Practice Director, Exponent   


 

This seminar featured SRP grantees Dr. Richard G. Luthy and Dr. Charles A. Menzie. Dr. Luthy of the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford University reviewed recent experimental studies and modeling work that describe the up-take of hydrophobic organic contaminants by activated carbon amendment in sediment. The emphasis was on practical aspects of testing and modeling to assess the suitability of sediment for in-place treatment of persistent organic contaminants by activated carbon sorbent. A comparison of different feeding traits of benthic organisms illustrates the degree of treatment needed to achieve a desired remedial success of sorbent amendment. Recent work with polysulfide rubber-modified activated suggesting the potential to treat both mercury and hydrophobic organic compounds was also presented. A follow-up by Dr. Charles Menzie of Exponent Inc. discussed the efficacy of various methods of application of SediMite, a pelletized agglomerate that consists of activated carbon, to contaminated sediments. He focused on the effectiveness of delivery methods designed to minimally disturb sediment, yet deliver activated carbon amendment to the depth inhabited by biota.


 

Session IV:


February 14, 2011; 2:00 - 4:00pm ET
For an archive of this webinar please refer to EPA's Clu-in Training & Events webpage 

 

  • Moderator: Steve Mangion, Superfund and Technology Liaison, US EPA Region 1
  • Presenter: Dr. Danny Reible  , Bettie Margaret Smith Professor of Environmental Health Engineering, Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas
  • Presenter: Dr. Harold D. May  , Professor, Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina

 

This seminar featured SRP grantees Dr. Harold D. May and Dr. Danny Reible. Dr. May, Professor, Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina presented "Integrating Microbial Biostimulation and Electrolytic Aeration to Degrade POPs" and Dr. Reible, Bettie Margaret Smith Professor of Environmental Health Engineering, Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas presented "Enhancing Biodegration in Sediment Caps Using Carbon Cloth Electrodes".

 

Dr. May discussed bioaugmentation of Fox River (WI) sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and testing with bioactive granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing PCB dechlorinating and degrading bacteria. He also described how electron donors and acceptors for microbial PCB dechlorination and degradation can be delivered electrochemically to further stimulate the biodegradation of these POPs. These methods show significant reductions in the concentration of weathered PCBs. Dr. Reible showed that although sediment capping is normally considered strictly a contaminant containment technology, it can trigger microbial processes to transform or detoxify both inorganic and organic contaminants. He described research exploring these microbial processes and ways of improving their effectiveness. The presentation focused on how to enhance microbial transformation of hydrophobic organic compounds in sediment caps through the use of electrodes to change terminal electron acceptors and redox conditions.

 


For more information, contact:

Heather F. Henry, Ph.D. (http://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/supported/dert/hsrb/henry/index.cfm)
Health Scientist Administrator
Superfund Research Program
Tel (919) 541-5330
Fax (919) 316-4606
henryh@niehs.nih.gov

or

Justin Crane
Tel (919) 794-4702
cranej2@niehs.nih.gov

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