Skip Navigation

Your Environment. Your Health.

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Novel Methods to Assess the Effects of Chemicals on Child Development


University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Susan Schantz, Ph.D.
schantz@illinois.edu
http://vetmed.illinois.edu/ikids/index.html

Project Description:

Child Health Specialist: Susan Korrick, M.D.
Developmental and reproductive effects of environmental contaminants

Website
P20 Publications
P01 Publications

Environmental Exposures

Bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates, high-fat diet (HFD)

Primary Health Outcomes

Neurological and reproductive development, oxidative stress

The Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center uses a multidisciplinary approach to address critical gaps in our knowledge about how exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals affects child development. Researchers are examining a group of pregnant women and their babies being followed in Urbana, Ill. (I-KIDS Cohort), as well as adolescents from New Bedford, Mass. (NBC cohort).

Phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA) are endocrine disrupting chemicals found in many consumer products. Center researchers are using animal models and human studies to investigate the effects of these chemicals, alone and combination with a high fat diet, on reproductive and neural development during the critical prenatal and adolescent development periods. The researchers will also assess cellular and molecular mechanisms that might be involved in health effects stemming from endocrine disruptor exposures and diet.


Back to top Back to top

Project 1: Joint effects of endocrine disruptors, diet, and BMI on child development

Project leader: Susan Korrick, M.D.

susan.korrick@channing.harvard.edu

This study is investigating the effects of phthalates and BPA, both alone and combination with a high fat diet, on physical and neurodevelopment. Researchers are examining a group of pregnant women and their babies as well as a group of adolescents.  


Back to top Back to top

Project 2: Endocrine disrupting chemicals, diet, and gonadal toxicity

Project leader: Jodi A. Flaws, Ph.D.

jflaws@illinois.edu

Using mouse models that allow the study of the timing of the exposures assessed in the two population studies (project 1), researchers are exploring mechanisms by which endocrine disrupters and a high fat diet adversely affect reproductive health. Findings from this work could lead to the development of new targets for the treatment of chemical/diet-induced reproductive problems.


Back to top Back to top

Project 3: Endocrine disruptors and diet: effects on the developing cortex

Project leader: Janice M. Juraska, Ph.D.

jjuraska@illinois.edu

This study is examining how endocrine disruptors and diet affect the normal development of the nervous system by using mouse models to examine the timing of the exposures assessed in the two population studies (project 1). The research is specifically exploring cellular and molecular mechanisms and will also identify neurological outcomes that can be assessed in longitudinal follow-ups of the population studies.


Back to top Back to top

Community Outreach and Translation Core

Core Leader: Barbara H. Fiese

bhfiese@illinois.edu

The Illinois Community Outreach and Translation Core (COTC) serves as the organizing hub of information and emerging knowledge about the effects that chemical exposure and high fat diets can have on developing children and adolescents. It links center investigators with community stakeholders including pediatricians, public health professionals, parenting groups, and policy makers.


Back to top Back to top


Back to Top

Share This Page:

Page Options:

Request Translation Services