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Lisa Helbling Chadwick

Genes, Environment, and Health Branch (GEH)

Lisa Helbling Chadwick
Lisa Helbling Chadwick, Ph.D.
Health Scientist Administrator
Tel (850) 727-7218
Fax (301) 451-5392
chadwickl@niehs.nih.gov
P.O. Box 12233
Mail Drop MD K3-15
Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709
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Lisa Helbling Chadwick, Ph.D.,  joined the Division of Extramural Research and Training in 2008. Chadwick is one of the program directors of the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program, and is one of the scientific contacts for NIEHS-funded epigenetics studies. In addition, she directs extramural research programs in transgenerational inheritance, aryl hydrocarbon receptor biology, microbiome/environment interaction, and the development of non-mammalian model systems for environmental health research. She represents NIEHS in a number of trans-NIH programs, including the Human Microbiome Project, the Knockout Mouse Program, and the Trans-NIH Zebrafish Coordinating Committee. Chadwick’s scientific background is in complex trait genetics, epigenetics, and chromatin biology. She received her Ph.D. in genetics from Case Western Reserve University for her work on identifying genetic modifiers of X chromosome inactivation. Prior to joining the Division of Extramural Research and Training, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Division of Intramural Research at NIEHS, studying the role of chromatin remodeling complexes in the maintenance of heterochromatin.

 

Programs:

  • Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Biology
  • Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (http://www.niehs.nih.govhttp://edit:9992/Rhythmyx/assembler/render?sys_authtype=0&sys_variantid=567&sys_revision=1&sys_contentid=75188&sys_context=0)
  • Environmental Epigenetics (http://www.niehs.nih.govhttp://edit:9992/Rhythmyx/assembler/render?sys_authtype=0&sys_variantid=567&sys_revision=7&sys_contentid=25101&sys_context=0)
  • Microbiome/Environment Interactions
  • NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program
  • Non-Mammalian Model Systems
  • Transgenerational Inheritance

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