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Your Environment. Your Health.

Climate Change & Human Health

 

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Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Working Group II Report  : This contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report considers the vulnerability and exposure of human and natural systems, the observed impacts and future risks of climate change, and the potential for and limits to adaptation. The chapters of the report assess risks and opportunities for societies, economies, and ecosystems around the world.

Man wiping his brow

A changing climate impacts our health and wellbeing. The major public health organizations of the world have said that climate change is a critical public health problem. Climate change makes many existing diseases and conditions worse, but it may also help introduce new pests and pathogens into new regions or communities. As the planet warms, oceans expand and the sea level rises, floods and droughts become more frequent and intense, and heat waves and hurricanes become more severe. The most vulnerable people—children, the elderly, the poor, and those with underlying health conditions—are at increased risk for health effects from climate change. Climate change also stresses our health care infrastructure and delivery systems.

Steps can be taken to lessen climate change (“mitigation”) and reduce its impacts on our health and the health of future generations (“adaptation”). Some of these steps can yield benefits for our health, environment, economy, and society at the same time. The federal government has called for efforts to support adaptation and mitigation of climate change to create healthier, more sustainable communities. The goals of the NIEHS Climate Change and Human Health Program align with these efforts.

Figure 1: Changes in greenhouse gas concentrations and other drivers change our global climate altering the human; mitigation alters climate and both mitigation and adaptation alter the human environment;  the predominant impact on human health is through environmental changes as a result of climate change although there are direct impacts from both climate changes and mitigation/adaptation.

Figure 1: Changes in greenhouse gas concentrations and other drivers change our global climate altering the human; mitigation alters climate and both mitigation and adaptation alter the human environment; the predominant impact on human health is through environmental changes as a result of climate change although there are direct impacts from both climate changes and mitigation/adaptation.

Goals:

  • Provide research on human health impacts related to climate change and adaptation
  • Raise awareness and create new partnerships to advance key areas of health research and knowledge development on human health effects of climate change
  • Serve as an authoritative source of information on human health effects of climate change for NIEHS stakeholders, including the public
  • Represent NIEHS science in climate change research and policy activities at the NIH, HHS, federal government, and international levels 

 

Contacts

John M. Balbus, Senior Advisor for Public Health
John M. Balbus, M.D. (http://www.niehs.nih.gov/about/od/advisor/balbus/index.cfm)
Senior Advisor for Public Health
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
31 Center Drive
Room B1CO2
Bethesda, Maryland 20892-2256
Tel (301) 496-2920
Fax (301) 496-0563
balbusjm@niehs.nih.gov

 

Caroline Dilworth, Ph.D.
Caroline Dilworth, Ph.D. (http://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/supported/dert/phb/dilworth/index.cfm)
Health Scientist Administrator

Tel (919) 541-7727
Fax (919) 316-4606
dilworthch@niehs.nih.gov

 

Banalata (Bono) Sen, Ph.D.
Banalata (Bono) Sen, Ph.D.
Program Coordinator

Tel (919) 541-4692
senb@niehs.nih.gov

 

Kimberly Thigpen Tart, J.D.
Kimberly Thigpen Tart, J.D.
Program Analyst

Tel (919) 541-5377
Fax (301) 496-0563
thigpenk@niehs.nih.gov

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