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Your Environment. Your Health.

Reproductive Endocrinology Group

Mammary Gland Development/Lactation Biology

Suzanne E. Fenton, Ph.D.
Suzanne E. Fenton, Ph.D.
Group Leader
Tel (919) 541-4141
fentonse@niehs.nih.gov
P.O. Box 12233
Mail Drop E1-08
Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709
Delivery Instructions
Whole mount preparations can be used to assess mammary gland development. This mammary gland whole mount shows the branching density, epithelial outgrowth, bud formation off the major ducts, and development of the terminal end buds (the tear-drop shaped structures) in a 21 day old female rat.
Whole mount preparations can be used to assess mammary gland development. This mammary gland whole mount shows the branching density, epithelial outgrowth, bud formation off the major ducts, and development of the terminal end buds (the tear-drop shaped structures) in a 21 day old female rat.

Research Summary

The Reproductive Endocrinology Group focuses on the role of environmental chemicals in breast developmental timing as it relates to puberty, increased susceptibility to breast cancer, and altered lactational ability. The group provides expertise in the use of whole mount preparations in evaluating early life development of both male and female rat offspring and lifelong effects in female mice.

 

Major areas of research:

 

  • Studying human disease using mice and rat models, translating internal dose in animal models to known exposure levels in U.S. residents.
  • Investigating the developmental effects of high use herbicides and their metabolites, other compounds such as surfactants, phenolic compounds used in food storage, and common lipophilic flame retardants and pollutants.
  • Understanding the types and ratios of environmental compounds that transfer to the infant via breast milk.

 

Suzanne Fenton received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, in the areas of endocrinology and reproductive physiology, specifically training in the area of mammary gland and lactation biology.

 

She completed her post-doctoral work at the University of North Carolina's Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center in Chapel Hill, NC in the area of cancer biology.

 

Fenton worked as a principal investigator at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Reproductive Toxicology Division from 1998 to 2009, mentoring numerous trainees. She was a co-recipient of the 2008 Level I US Scientific and Technological Achievement Award, an EPA top honor, as well as several other awards.

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