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Environmental Factor, May 2012

ONES awardees elected to American Society for Clinical Investigation

By Eddy Ball

Brent Carter, M.D.

Carter is one of seven young researchers (see story) who received ONES awards in 2007. (Photo courtesy of University of Iowa)

John Hollingsworth, M.D.

Hollingsworth was part of a group of six scientists (see story) awarded ONES support in 2008. (Photo courtesy of Steve McCaw)

Two NIEHS-funded investigators, Brent Carter, M.D., and John Hollingsworth, M.D., received an honor that recognizes exceptional early career accomplishments — election to the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI). ASCI is a highly respected medical honor society established in 1908.

Hollingsworth (http://pulmonary.medicine.duke.edu/faculty/details/0265267)  and Carter, (http://www.int-med.uiowa.edu/divisions/pulmonary/Directory/BrentCarter.html)  who are NIEHS Outstanding New Environmental Scientist awardees, are among the group of 68 new members (http://www.the-asci.org/news/2012_election.shtml)  elected to the membership in 2012. They were inducted into the society during the ASCI Dinner and New Member Induction Ceremony April 27 as part of the ASCI/American Academy of Pediatrics joint meeting (http://www.jointmeeting.org/program.cfm)  in Chicago.

When he learned of the election results, Hollingsworth wrote to colleagues at NIEHS, “I think this reflects very highly on the success of the ONES program at NIEHS.”

Early career support by NIEHS

Started in 2006, the highly competitive NIEHS ONES award is granted each year to a handful of nominees, on the basis of early-stage career promise in the field of the environmental health sciences. The award provides support for up to five years, as recipients establish their labs, research programs, and reputations, in what NIEHS hopes will be a long and productive relationship with the Institute.

Carter is an associate professor in the department of internal medicine at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, with research interests in pulmonary fibrosis, asthma, and acute lung injury. Carter currently holds two NIEHS grants, Lung Inflammation and Fibrosis After Asbestos Exposure Is Regulated by RAC1 (http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=8092539&icde=12068580&ddparam=&ddvalue=&ddsub=&cr=3&csb=default&cs=ASC)  and Hydrogen Peroxide and Asbestosis. (http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8197540&icde=12068642&ddparam=&ddvalue=&ddsub=&cr=2&csb=default&cs=ASC) 

Hollingsworth is an associate professor of medicine and assistant professor of immunology at Duke University Medical Center. His research program focuses on the interaction between exposure to common environmental factors and host vulnerability to complex heritable lung disease — work supported by two NIEHS grants, Ozone Primes Pulmonary Innate Immunity (http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8102068&icde=12068757&ddparam=&ddvalue=&ddsub=&cr=1&csb=default&cs=ASC)  and Environmental Epigenetics and Innate Immunity. (http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8175734&icde=12068839&ddparam=&ddvalue=&ddsub=&cr=2&csb=default&cs=ASC) 

ASCI – the chosen few

As the society’s website explains, “The ASCI is comprised of more than 2,800 physician-scientists from all medical specialties, elected to the society for their outstanding records of scholarly achievement in biomedical research.” The number of new members inducted each year is limited to 80 individuals under the age of 45, with only about half of the physicians nominated by members of the society being selected for membership.

ASCI publishes the Journal of Clinical Investigation, a peer-reviewed biomedical research journal recognized for its broad readership and impact.




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