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NIEHS ethics counselor wins NIH mentoring award

By Emily Zhou
December 2010

Bruce Androphy, J.D.
Androphy is a key member of the NIEHS senior leadership team. Under his direction, the Institute has significantly expanded its ethics initiatives. See stories about Androphy and the Office of Ethics, since his appointment early this year, in the January (http://www.niehs.nih.gov/news/newsletter/2010/january/spotlight-posts.cfm), February (http://www.niehs.nih.gov/news/newsletter/2010/february/spotlight-bioethics.cfm), May (http://www.niehs.nih.gov/news/newsletter/2010/may/spotlight-ethics.cfm) and July (http://www.niehs.nih.gov/news/newsletter/2010/july/inside-ethics.cfm) issues of the Environmental Factor. (Photo courtesy of Steve McCaw)

Director of the NIEHS Office of Ethics and Deputy Ethics Counselor Bruce Androphy, J.D. (http://www.niehs.nih.gov/about/od/ethics/index.cfm), received a Workforce Recruitment Program award at the NIH 2010 Disability Employment Awareness Month observance and awards program Oct. 28. Androphy was recognized for his superior leadership in mentoring Tim Moore, a law student with a disability, last summer at NIEHS.

Moore, who attends the North Carolina Central University (NCCU) School of Law, worked on the forensics aspect of legal research, reviewed Office of Government Ethics (OGE) SF-278 (http://www.usoge.gov/forms/sf278.aspx) Exit NIEHS public disclosure reports, and improved online databases on the NIEHS intranet. He also learned about ethics law and helped with manuscript revision.

"Not only does your service establish NIH as an inclusive working environment," said NIH Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity Management Deputy Director Hilda Dixon (http://oeodm.od.nih.gov/about/directory/index.aspx) Exit NIEHS of Androphy's service, "but you also have offered both students and co-workers an encouragement to appreciate one another."

Androphy said he really enjoyed the experience of working with a student with a disability very much and would certainly do it again. He praised Moore's outstanding work ethic.

Androphy was approached in the spring about whether he would supervise a second-year law school student from NCCU as a summer intern. During their interview, Moore impressed Androphy with his resume and maturity.

"We were short-staffed at the moment, and we thought he would be a great help for us," Androphy said.

Staff at NIEHS made the office entrance and other necessary equipment ready to accommodate Moore, who found NIEHS an extremely easy-access facility, as compared to facilities of other federal agencies. Moore told Androphy that NIEHS is one of the best places he has worked.

Androphy said that should the opportunity again be available, he would be happy to accommodate more legal interns in the future.

(Emily Zhou, Ph.D., is a research fellow in the NIEHS Laboratory of Signal Transduction Inositol Signaling Group.)



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