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Your Environment. Your Health.

Extreme Weather, Climate, and Health: Putting Science into Practice

January 30 - 31, 2013

Summary

The National Institutes of Health (NIH), in coordination with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American Public Health Association (APHA), National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO), hosted a meeting to bring together NIH and CDC academic, state and city grantees working on Climate Change and Health projects to present their latest findings and discuss strategies for linking science to practice. This meeting also served as a unique opportunity to raise awareness of the excellent work our grantees are conducting across HHS.

 

 

Meeting Agenda and Material

Day 1: January 30, 2013

8:30 – 8:55 am
Welcome

Judy Qualters, CDC/NCEH 
John Balbus, NIH/NIEHS 
Howard Koh, Assistant Secretary for Health, HHS 

8:55 – 9:15 am
Overview

Christopher Portier, Director, NCEH 
Preliminary Significant US Weather and Climate Events for 2012 - Christopher Portier, Ph.D.(303KB)

Linda Birnbaum, Director, NIEHS 
NIEHS-CDC Climate Change and Human Health Grantee meeting - Linda S. Birnbaum, Ph.D.(873KB)

9:15 – 9:30 am
CDC current programs and direction

George Luber, CDC/NCEH 
Overview of CDC’s Climate and Health Program - George Luber, Ph.D.(2MB)

9:30 – 9:45 am
NIH current programs and direction

Caroline Dilworth, NIH/NIEHS 
NIH-Supported Research on Climate Change and Human Health - Caroline H. Dilworth, Ph.D.(653KB)

9:45 – 10:00 am
Break
10:00 – 11:45 am
Panel 1 – Latest research advances

This session will focus on the latest scientific advances emerging from NIH and CDC research grantees, with an emphasis on how scientific efforts have been and could be better directed toward the most pressing public health practice community needs 

10:00 – 10:15
Joel Schwartz, Harvard University

Health Impacts of Weather Extremes and Long-term Weather Variability on Vulnerable Populations 
Challenges and Opportunities in Estimating the Direct Effects of Climate on Health - Schwartz, Gold and Zanobetti(564KB)

10:15 – 10:30
Shao Lin, New York State Department of Health

Extreme Weather, Birth Defects, and Lyme Disease: Translating Research Findings into Public Health Practice 

10:30 – 10:45
Lynn Grattan, University of Maryland

Ciguatera and Climate Change: New Evidence for Blunting of Effect by Population Changes 
Ciguatera and Climate Change: New Evidence for a Blunting of Effect by Population Changes - Lynn M. Grattan Ph.D.(880KB)

10:45 – 11:00
Jonathan Patz, University of Wisconsin

Climate Change Impacts on Energy Demand and Health 
Climate Change Impacts on Energy Demand and Health - Jonathan Patz, PI(2MB)

11:00 – 11:45
Discussion (Moderator: Gwen Collman, NIEHS)
11:45 am – 1:00 pm
Lunch
1:00 – 2:45 pm
Panel 2 – How science can best aid public health planning and response

This session will highlight ongoing planning and response projects from CDC practice grantees with an emphasis on how science has been and could be better integrated into projects moving forward. 

1:00 – 1:15
Andrew Smith, Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Preparing for Extreme Heat Events in Maine? You’ve Got to be Kidding! 
Maine Climate and Health: Preparing for Extreme Heat Events in Maine - Andrew Smith, S.M, Sc.D.(1MB)

1:15 – 1:30
Jae Douglas, Oregon Center for Health Protection

Oregon's Climate and Health Program: Raising Capacity to Address Climate Risk at the Local Level 
Oregon's Climate and Health Program: Preparing Local and State Public Health to Address the Impacts of Global Climate Change - Jae P. Douglas, Ph.D., MSW(728KB)

1:30 – 1:45
Nathan Graber, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

New York City Climate and Health: Responding Today, Adapting for Tomorrow 
New York City Climate and Health: Responding Today, Adapting for Tomorrow - Nathan Graber, MD, MPH(855KB)

1:45 – 2:00
Lorraine L. (Lorri) Cameron, Michigan Department of Community Health

Local Climate Adaptation: Research and Practice in Michigan 
Local Climate Health Adaptation: Research and Practice in Michigan - Lorri Cameron, Ph.D.(1MB)

2:00 – 2:45
Discussion (Moderator: Gino Marinucci, CDC)
2:45 – 3:00 pm
Break
3:00 – 4:30 pm
Panel 3 – Surveillance data and indicators for public health solutions

This session will highlight data needs and challenges for both the research and public health practice community. Speakers will discuss how they are approaching data availability and integration as well as identify current gaps in data sources and methodology. 

3:00 – 3:15
Madeleine Thomson, Columbia University

Climate Information for Public Health Action: From Data to Development 
Climate Information for Public Health Action: from data to development - Madeleine C. Thomson(3MB)

3:15 – 3:30
Paul English, California Department of Public Health

Indicators for Extreme Weather and Health: What is Needed for Better Surveillance 
Indicators for Extreme Weather and Health: What is Needed for Better Surveillance - Paul English, Ph.D. MPH(997KB)

3:30 – 3:45
Roger Peng, Johns Hopkins University

Statistical Issues Arising from Integrating National Databases 
Statistical Issues Arising from Integrating National Databases - Roger D. Peng, Ph.D.(336KB)

3:45 – 4:30
Discussion (Moderator: John Balbus, NIEHS)
4:30 – 5:00 pm
Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health (MATCH)

This interactive session will include a live demonstration of this new online research tool developed by the Interagency Climate Change and Human Health Working Group's Data Integration team of the U.S. Global Change Research Program. MATCH is a geoportal repository for climate science and public health metadata of monitoring, surveillance, early warning systems, and other related research sets. 

Moderator: Juli Trtanj, NOAA
The Climate Change & Human Health Group (CCHHG): Data integration and the Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health - Trtanj, Mize and Furie(4MB)


Day 2 - January 31, 2013

8.30 – 9:15 am
Day 2 Keynote Address

Kim Knowlton, Natural Resources Defense Council

The National Climate Assessment 
The National Climate Assessment: Process, outcomes & how you can contribute - Kim Knowlton, Ph.D.(5MB)

9:15 – 10:45 am
Panel 4 – Addressing vulnerable populations

This session will highlight approaches to identifying vulnerable populations and associated planning and response. The panel will also discuss how research can inform adaptation, with a special emphasis on addressing health disparities and vulnerable populations. The session will begin with short presentations from three speakers (15 minutes each) followed by an open Q and A and discussion. 

9:15 – 9:30
Julia Gohlke, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Community-Engaged Research in Urban and Rural Settings to Identify Health Risks from Extreme Heat Events 
Community-Engaged Research in Urban and Rural Settings to Identify Health Risks from Extreme Heat Events - Gohlke, Zaitchik, Kent, Smith, Bernhard, Evans, Maples, Crider, Threadgill, Johnson, Tyson and McClure(2MB)

9:30 – 9:45
Jalonne White-Newsome, WE ACT for Environmental Justice

Building Resilience From Within: The Intersection of Research, Practice and Partnerships in a Changing Climate 
Building resilience from within: the intersection of research, practice and partnerships in a changing climate - Jalonne L. White-Newsome, Ph.D.(3MB)

9:45 – 10:00
Daniel Johnson, Indiana University – Purdue University at Indianapolis

Supplementing Extreme Heat Vulnerability Modeling with Remotely Sensed Data 
Climate and Health in Washington State - Richard Fenske(1MB)

10:00 – 10:45
Discussion (Moderator: Sandra Howard, HHS)
10:45 – 11:00 am
Break
11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Panel 5 – Critical partnerships and consortia

This session will highlight successful models for researchers and practitioners working together, as well as examples of community involvement in research and/or public health adaptation efforts. The session will begin with short presentations from three speakers (15 minutes each) followed by an open Q and A and discussion. 

11:00 – 11:15
Kathleen Clancy, New York State Health Department

Stakeholder Perspectives Related to Health Department Priorities for Climate Change 
Stakeholder Perspectives Related to Health Department Priorities for Climate Change - Kathleen Clancy, MPH(153KB)

11:15 – 11:30
Simon Mason, International Research Institute

International Partnerships to Understand, Anticipate, and Manage the Impacts of Climate 
International Partnerships to Understand, Anticipate, and Manage the Impacts of Climate - Simon J. Mason(850KB)

11:30 – 11:45
Christine Jessup, Fogarty International Center

Developing International Hubs for Global Environmental and Occupational Health Research (GEOHealth) 
Developing International Hubs for Global Environmental and Occupational Health - Christine Jessup, Ph.D.(1MB)

11:45 – 12:30
Discussion (Moderator: Joshua Rosenthal, Fogarty International Center)
12:30 – 1:30 pm
Lunch
1:30 – 3:00 pm
Panel 6 – Translating science and practice for decision makers

This session will focus on best practices for translating and communicating research and practice to reach decision makers, including key message development, case studies, and other communication tools. 

1:30 – 1:45
Andrew Revkin, The New York Times/Pace University

The New Communication Climate 

1:45 – 2:00
Donald Hoppert, APHA

Making the Case with Congress 
Making the case to Congress - Donald Hoppert(47KB)

2:00 – 2:15
Susan Bales, Frameworks Institute

Why Climate Science Needs Social Science 
Why Science Needs Social Science to Communicate About Climate Change and Oceans(3MB)

2:15 – 3:00
Discussion (Moderator: Kimberly Thigpen Tart, NIEHS)
3:00 – 3:30 pm
Closing remarks and group reflections

Claudia Thompson, NIEHS, and George Luber, CDC/NCEH 

3:30 pm
End of symposium

 

Meeting Location

The Hubert H. Humphrey Building
200 Independence Avenue S.W.
Washington, D.C., 20201

 

Contact

Caroline Dilworth, Ph.D.
Caroline Dilworth, Ph.D.
Health Scientist Administrator
Tel (919) 541-7727
Fax (919) 316-4606
dilworthch@niehs.nih.gov
P.O. Box 12233
Mail Drop K3-12
Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709
Delivery Instructions

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